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Picture of Women in Greek Advertisements in the 1960s

Women in Greek Advertisements in the 1960s

Author(s): Johannis Tsoumas

Book Description

Between the poles of the Cold War era’s sales promotion standards, print advertising thrived in Greece in the 1960s, particularly as it related to female consumption. What are the similarities between American women as protagonists in the world of advertising and women as consumers in 1960s Greece? Are the women portrayed in print advertisements nothing but “hybrids” of the American consumption model and the Greek consumerism boom of the era? What were the technical and esthetic, but also social and cultural connotations of female advertising in Greece at that time? How do they reflect women’s position in society?

Through a detailed, historical case study with a wealth of illustrations and a concise analysis of advertising communication, this book investigates hitherto unknown data, and shows the importance of the role of Greek women, not only as consumers, but primarily as protagonists in the formation of a new consumption model which had been imported from the United States.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-3382-0
ISBN-10: 1-5275-3382-4
Date of Publication: 01/07/2019
Pages / Size: 173 / A5
Price: £58.99
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Biography

Johannis Tsoumas received his MA in History of Design from Middlesex University, UK, in 1993 and his PhD in the History of Art from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 2002. He has published widely in both Greek and international journals, and he is the author of the books History of the Decorative Arts and Architecture in Europe and America (1760-1914) and The Emergence of Plastics Culture in Greece (1950-1970). He currently works at the Department of Interior Architecture of the University of West Attica, Greece, as an Art and Design Historian and a Fine Arts Tutor. His areas of research interest are nineteenth-century design, art and decorative arts history, and twentieth-century European popular, visual and material culture.