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Picture of The Sunset of Tradition and the Origin of the Great War

The Sunset of Tradition and the Origin of the Great War

Author(s): Alexander Wolfheze
Subject: History

Book Description

From a Traditionalist perspective, the cultural history of the Modern Era amounts to the genesis of the Dark Age. The Traditionalist meta-historical narrative deconstructs the modernist myth of “historic progress” as an anti-intellectual superstition. It exposes the quintessential features of Modernity – namely, secular nihilism, historical materialism, socio-political egalitarianism, and collective narcissism – as structural inversions of Traditional values. The historic accumulation of these inversions set the stage for a final showdown between Tradition and Modernity. In terms of ancient prophecy and Traditionalist philosophy, the Great War represents the apocalyptic sunset of the world of Tradition. This work follows the forgotten path of the philosophia perennis to trace the historic onset of the Dark Age. It clears away a century-deep deposit of “progressive” illusions and “politically-correct” axioms. The restored road of Traditional thought will lead a new generation of scholars to their rightful inheritance: an intellectual tabula rasa on which history can be written anew.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-0606-0
ISBN-10: 1-5275-0606-1
Date of Publication: 01/03/2018
Pages / Size: 474 / A5
Price: £67.99
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Biography

Alexander Wolfheze received his MA in Semitic Languages and Cultures in 2004 and his cum laude PhD in the Humanities in 2011, both from Leiden University, the Netherlands. With extensive research experience in the fields of Assyriology and cultural anthropology, he has authored several publications in the field of Near Eastern cultural history. His specializations are pre-modern epistemology and Traditionalist philosophy, which this book applies to the cultural history of the Modern Age – it is the first in a series of publications thematically related to the Great War, written in the framework of a thematic research project entitled The Greatest War.