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Picture of The Creative Advantages of Schizophrenia

The Creative Advantages of Schizophrenia

The Muse and the Mad Hatter

Author(s): Paul Kiritsis

Book Description

The aphorism that madness and creative genius are opposing sides of the same coin predates contemporary psychiatry and has existed since the time of the great Stagirite Aristotle. Schizophrenia is one mental disorder intimately linked with creative thinking and achievement. There is no shortage of eminent scientists, thinkers, writers, artists, composers, and political activists tentatively theorized to have precariously balanced the great divide between the demons of schizophrenia and the muses of creative illumination, including Rene Descartes, Emanuel Swedenborg, John Forbes Nash, Leonardo da Vinci, and Joan of Arc, to name but a few. However, is that association veracious in an empirical sense? If it is, how exactly are schizophrenia and creative illumination related? Using new empirical findings, this book sheds new light upon the age-old assumption and goes further still in explaining how creative potential with world-fashioning powers can be channelled in individuals with this diagnosis. Mental health practitioners will find this book both intriguing and useful.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-3165-9
ISBN-10: 1-5275-3165-1
Date of Publication: 01/06/2019
Pages / Size: 146 / A5
Price: £58.99
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Biography

Paul Kiritsis received his PsyD in Clinical Psychology from Sofia University, formerly the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology in Palo Alto, USA. He is a certified hypnotherapist, a researcher, artist, award-winning poet and short story writer, and the author of the creative compendium Confessions of a Split Mind. He holds postgraduate degrees in history, professional writing, and psychology. His clinical interests include schizophrenia and hallucinations, the temporal-lobe epilepsies and their neuropsychiatric comorbidities, and neurocognitive disorders. He is profoundly interested in the connection between creativity and disorder, as reflected in his published dissertation.