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Picture of The Lexical/Functional Divide in Aphasic Production – Poorly Studied Aphasic Syndromes and Theoretical Morpho-Syntax

The Lexical/Functional Divide in Aphasic Production – Poorly Studied Aphasic Syndromes and Theoretical Morpho-Syntax

A Collection of Case Studies in Italian

Author(s): Ludovico Franco

Book Description

This monograph is structured as a collection of clinical case studies all addressing the relationship between lexicon and morphosyntax. It shows that various less-studied aphasic syndromes – including Logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia, Mixed Trascortical Aphasia, and Crossed Aphasia – and not only ‘classic’ Broca’s Aphasia can enhance findings worthy of consideration in contemporary theoretical debates on the status of traditional categories, and particularly on the lexical/functional divide in grammar. The rationale of this study is precisely to build a bridge between experimental evidence from clinical linguistics and theoretical arguments from morpho-syntactic analysis. Furthermore, this book addresses the recent resurgence of interest within neuropsychology in single case studies, which can be crucial in order to corroborate (or falsify) theoretical advancements in linguistics.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-4438-5816-8
ISBN-10: 1-4438-5816-1
Date of Publication: 01/06/2014
Pages / Size: 195 / A5
Price: £39.99
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Biography

Ludovico Franco is a FCT Researcher in the Research Centre in Linguistics of Universidade Nova de Lisboa (CLUNL). He has previously been a Fellow in neurolinguistics and clinical linguistics (European Social Fund Program) at the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, Italy, and received his first PhD in Theoretical Linguistics from the University of Florence/Siena, Italy, in 2008. He obtained his second PhD in Clinical Linguistics from the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice in 2012. His areas of specialization are theoretical syntax and comparative and historical morpho-syntax, and neurolinguistics, with an emphasis on the representation, and processing of syntax and morphology.