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Picture of Reflections of Roman Imperialisms

Reflections of Roman Imperialisms

Editor(s): Marko A. Janković, Vladimir D. Mihajlović

Book Description

The papers collected in this volume provide invaluable insights into the results of different interactions between “Romans” and Others. Articles dealing with cultural changes within and outside the borders of Roman Empire highlight the idea that those very changes had different results and outcomes depending on various social, political, economic, geographical and chronological factors. Most of the contributions here focus on the issues of what it means to be Roman in different contexts, and show that the concept and idea of Roman-ness were different for the various populations that interacted with Romans through several means of communication, including political alliances, wars, trade, and diplomacy. The volume also covers a huge geographical area, from Britain, across Europe to the Near East and the Caucasus, but also provides information on the Roman Empire through eyes of foreigners, such as the ancient Chinese.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-0625-1
ISBN-10: 1-5275-0625-8
Date of Publication: 01/04/2018
Pages / Size: 397 / A5
Price: £64.99
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Biography

Vladimir D. Mihajlović is an Assistant Professor at the Department of History at the University of Novi Sad, Serbia. His research interests focus on the transition from the late Iron Age to the Roman period, the relation of ancient written sources and archaeological interpretations, theoretical archaeology, and perception and usage of the past. In addition to his participation in several national research projects, he is co-organizer of the “Imperialism and Identities at the Edges of the Roman World” biannual conference.

Marko A. Jankovic is the Director of the Archaeological Collection of the Faculty of Philosophy at Belgrade University, Serbia. He is mainly interested in topics concerning everyday life in the Roman era and ways of using such practices in constructing and maintaining various “Roman” and local identities. He is co-editor of The Edges of the Roman World (2014) and co-organizer of the biannual conference “Imperialism and Identities at the Edges of the Roman World”. He is also engaged in the “Archaeological Culture and Identities in the Western Balkans” research project.