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Picture of Physiological and Anatomical Implications of Salinity on Rice as a Semi-Aquatic Species

Physiological and Anatomical Implications of Salinity on Rice as a Semi-Aquatic Species

Author(s): Rachel Predeepa-Javahar

Book Description

Rice is a well-established salt-sensitive cereal crop and is the second most widely grown and consumed food crop worldwide. It is also a semi-aquatic cereal crop. The rice plant has many adaptations for surviving the aquatic environment, which include the development of specialised roots called adventitious roots, increase in aerenchymal area, increase in the number of roots, reduction of laterals, stunted growth, thickening of the apoplastic barrier in the roots and induction of the ‘radial oxygen loss (ROL) barrier’. How these adaptations respond to salinity is a question that has been least explored, and is addressed in this book.

A number of interesting findings on the response of the plant to salinity under stagnant deoxygenated conditions (waterlogged conditions for performing laboratory level studies were established using hydroponics) were compared to the normal way of growing rice plants using hydroponics (fully aerated solutions). The purpose of this study is to give a precise representation of the response of rice plants to salt stress under its natural environment.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-4438-4098-9
ISBN-10: 1-4438-4098-X
Date of Publication: 01/10/2012
Pages / Size: 130 / A5
Price: £39.99
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Biography

Rachel Predeepa-Javahar, currently employed as a Lecturer at Alpha Arts and Science College, University of Madras, India, did research on rice that has led to the compilation of this book at The University of Western Australia. She has to her credit three years of teaching experience in biology, microbiology, biochemistry and biotechnology, with versatile research experience on salt stress. Besides rice, she has also worked on legumes, cotton and the symbiotic bacteria Rhizobium. Her research interests include biofertilisers, plant-microbe interaction, food biotechnology (especially probiotics) and salt stress physiology in plants and microbes.