Cambridge Scholars Guest Edited Collections

We are currently offering the opportunity to contribute a chapter in a number of Scholarly Guest Edited collections across our publishing fields.

Please click here to download a chapter submission form. These pages are updated regularly, so please ensure to check back if you do not currently see a suitable title.

Please note that Cambridge Scholars Publishing Limited is not affiliated to or associated with Cambridge University Press or the University of Cambridge. 

All completed submissions should be sent to admin@cambridgescholars.com

Modern Design and Construction in Building, Bridge and Dam Engineering

Abstract

The advancement of computational techniques and the increasing utilization of computers have endorsed excessive developments in structural engineering design and construction. Indeed, the orientation and design of many new, modern structures might not have been possible without the employment of innovative computational methods and numerical analysis. The more traditional style of learning from structural failures has disappeared because of the benefits of computational and numerical approaches considering 3D modeling procedures. Innovations in materials and practices have had a huge impact on the engineering world.

Advanced techniques in solving engineering problems such as fatigue, composite materials, fracture mechanics, structural control systems, seismic engineering, and thermal effects on structures and materials have been intensively employed in recent decades. On the one hand, the scale and profundity of knowledge existing today and the growing range of modern and complex structures have led to an increase in the expertise of structural engineers, but, on the other, such state-of-the-art methods might not guarantee a sustainable and environmentally-friendly structure.

This volume discusses such state-of-the-art design and construction methods in the field of civil and structural engineering. It considers the design and construction of civil structures such as buildings, bridges, stadiums, and transmission towers using the most recent engineering tools, technologies and methods, including, but not limited to, artificial intelligence, HoloLens, virtual and mixed reality, building information modelling and management, and performance-based design.

In short, this volume investigates new tools, technologies and methods that are being developed with accurate planning, design, and construction such that they reduce the time and expenses of projects while management, operation quality, and overall sustainability are maintained.

About the Editor

Dr Khaled Ghaedi is the founder and Principal of PASOFAL Engineering Group (https://pasofal.com/), a group dedicating to solving the most complex engineering problems. Dr Ghaedi has worked in both academia and industry for over 16 years, and has provided consultation for major projects such as the MRT Putrajaya Line and Pavilion Damansara Heights in Malaysia, among others. He is the author of several books and papers, and his work has been published in a number of well-known journals in different engineering fields such as earthquake engineering, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and damage assessment of buildings. He is currently the Structural Technical Director of an engineering software and solutions provider in Malaysia which supports professional engineers and engineering students in Southeast Asia.

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Sustainability 2.0: Discourse and Practice in the Luxury World

Abstract

In 1987, the United Nations defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (Our Common Future, also known as the Brundtland Report).

In 2013, the luxury, sports, and lifestyle conglomerate PPR rebranded as Kering to signify its transformation and commitment to sustainability. Since then, a discourse about sustainability pervaded the luxury world, raising numerous questions about the compatibility between the two worlds.

The objective of this volume is to define a paradigm for sustainable luxury that takes into account enablers and constraints of the sector.

It will gather together contributions from different academic fields investigating the discursive practices within the world of luxury and its intersection with sustainability. Contributions from practitioners working within this space are also welcome.

About the Editor

Esterina Nervino is currently Assistant Professor at the Department of English and the Department of Marketing at the City University of Hong Kong, where she is also Associate Director of the Sales and Marketing Consulting Unit. She is Junior Adjunct Professor of Intercultural Communication and Language Variation at the Universita’ degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy, and a member of the Research Centre for Professional Communication in English at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and her research interests include social semiotics, multimodality, business communication, luxury studies in relation to art, space, sustainability, and retail experience.

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work and Business

Abstract

The future of work and business is being disrupted and transformed at a frightening pace – robotics and artificial intelligence are synergistically merging to radically improve corporate productivity; to increase low-paid unskilled jobs (e.g., ‘gig’ economy); to obliterate higher-paid professional and unskilled jobs; and consequently, to worsen existing knavish social inequalities. The need for human-centred action is palpable, in order to stifle the looming adverse, or even catastrophic social affects; and action is needed by all stakeholders - from government policies that allow companies to prosper and universities to innovate; to universities accepting social responsibility to supply job-ready graduates for a new world of work; to agile companies embracing new technological tools for human-machine synergies; and to individuals accepting personal responsibility to embark on a new era and philosophy of life-long learning in an ambiguous work milieu. This book is an exploration of what has been called the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’; how that revolution will likely impact the future of work and business; and what stakeholders can do to foster antifragility in an increasingly volatile and uncertain world.

About the Editor

Victor Egan has a background in engineering, project management, and university administration. He has extensive international experience, having consulted to the United Nations in Saudi Arabia, and to governments in Africa. Most recently, he was CEO of a start-up company specialising in courses in artificial intelligence and cyber security.

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Networked into Collaboration

Abstract

Many things, albeit living or artificial, can come together to collaborate for a higher functionality. Humans come to special units, animals swarm to share, and Things on the internet collaborate for more. All these provide functional degrees of parametrizable intelligence in multi-disciplinary applications.

About the Editor

Lambert Spaanenberg has 50 years of experience in microelectronics, embedded systems and neural engineering. Characteristic for his work is the constant innovation in teaching and research. At Twente University he developed GALS and BILBO design styles together with Phillips industries. Later, he turned turned to embedded intelligence in automotive, telephony and vision. 

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Drifting through Wonderlands: The City as Performance

Abstract

With 70% of the world’s population expected to live in urban environments by 2050, the city is poised to become the most significant space in shaping personal and communal identity. As contemporary cities become “event destinations”, a dialogue is emerging between the performing arts, the urban context, and social fabric. This volume will document and contribute to this dialogue from multi-disciplinary viewpoints, highlighting innovatory practices and the challenges a ‘performative’ urban environment poses, not least in the wake of the current pandemic, changing work practices, and new perspectives on urban living.

About the Editor

John C. Green is Professor of Theatre at Columbia College, Chicago, where he teaches theory and experimental performance practice in the department’s international graduate program in European Devised Performance. His most recent book is Mnemodrama in Action: An Introduction to the Theatre of Alessandro Fersen (2019).

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Fear, Risk and Safety: Post-Millennial Cultures of Fear in Literature

Abstract

In an essay on Karl Kraus, Walter Benjamin wrote in 1931 about the press being an instrument of power, which acquires its value through the character of the power that it serves. The proliferation of (social) media and available venues to circulate information in our times has created partisan cultures in which each side creates a narrative in which the other side, overtly or covertly, is dismissed, belittled, discredited, or demonized. Examples of such discursive polarizations include 9/11, Trumpism (MAGA), climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

The divided, inimical discursive environment invites a focus on risk, safety, and fear. It is a common human behavior to try to avoid risks to stay safe. When discourses underscore how making the wrong (political, social, or environmental) choice will increase risk and minimize safety, the element of fear is added and complicates matters.

The words “risk,” “safety,” and “fear” have been used to define our contemporary age and they have also been construed as a valid narrative in the human sciences against which most other narratives, imaginative or otherwise, can be read. This volume will bring together original articles studying cultures of fear in literature with a specific emphasis on post-millennial texts and will investigate such subtopics and fields as post-millennial political fiction, post-postmodern rewritings, “the culture of fear,” “world risk theory,” the postcolonial novel, post-humanist writing, trauma narratives, literary disaster discourses, environmental literature, apocalyptic scenarios, and personal apocalypse writing in the 21st century.

About the Editor

Mustafa Kirca is Assistant Professor of English in the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies at Çankaya University, Turkey. He holds an MA and PhD in English literature from Middle East Technical University, Turkey. He conducts research on translation and comparative studies, the contemporary novel, translation theory and postcolonial criticism. He co-edited Multicultural Narratives: Traces and Perspectives (2018), and Mapping Cultural Identities and Intersections: Imagological Readings (2019).

Adelheid Rundholz holds a PhD in Comparative Literature and in Romance Languages and Literatures (French) from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Her research interests are literature of migration, the novel genre, literary theory, world literature, aesthetics and language, comparative literature, and translation. She is the author of numerous publications, including articles on the graphic novel and cinema. She is co-editor of a forthcoming book on contemporary Lithuanian literature and participates in many conferences both in the USA and in Europe.

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“Russia’s ‘National Idea’ (Evolving Self-Identification) in the 21st Century”

Abstract

This collection of essays examines the latest thinking on Russia’s developing national identity in the 21st century by leading Russian and non-Russian social philosophers, political scientists, and cultural figures, as well as the actual effect their thinking has on Russia’s current and future internal and external policies. Special attention is expected to be paid to the cultural aspects of Russia’s “national idea.”

Key words: national identity (“national idea”); cultural codes; culture; civilization; collective memory; historical mission.

About the Editor

Alexander Burak is an Associate Professor of Russian Studies in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida, USA. He holds a Master’s in Translation Studies from the Translation and Interpretation Faculty (Division) of the Moscow Linguistic University and a PhD in Sociology from Lomonosov Moscow State University. He has published five books and numerous articles on intercultural communication and Russia’s national self-identification.

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Sacred Groves: Culture and Conservation

Abstract

Sacred groves are specific forests usually associated with a presiding deity. As sites of natural resources with traditional knowledge systems, they play crucial roles in biodiversity conservation around the world. This volume focuses on the religio-cultural aspects of sacred groves, and explores the spiritual dimension of the environment in the face of contemporary issues concerning threatened ecosystems and climate change.

About the Editor

Dr Rena Laisram teaches at the Department of History of Gauhati University, India. She is the author of the books Religion in Early Assam: An Archaeological History (2019), Early Meitei History: Religion, Society and the Manipur Puyas (2009), and The Growth and Development of Meitei Nationality: A Historical Approach (1998). Her research interests include religion and society, oral history and community, gender studies, and issues of identity.

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A Guide to Global Learning at Small Institutions: Diverse Models and Creative Solutions

Abstract

Small liberal arts colleges face unique challenges integrating international curricula and global learning. However, those same challenges, including limitations on staff, resources, and administration, can often inspire creative solutions. This volume offers models for diverse, effective approaches to providing global learning curriculum, and instruction to undergraduates at small institutions.

About the Editor

Jann Purdy is Professor of French and Chair of International Studies at Pacific University, Oregon. She edited Language beyond the Classroom (2018), a volume addressing service-learning for world language programs at several universities and colleges. Dr Purdy created a program in intercultural communication at Pacific University, and co-developed the Global Scholars Program, a global-learning curriculum.

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Enhanced Learning Environments: Technology and Innovation

Abstract

Technology became part of our lives and shifted the conventional lifestyles of individuals. Today we use technology to increase productivity and sufficiency in many areas from business to education. The integration of technological developments in our lives requires us to be up to date learner and using new technological tools for both individual and professional learning. This book presents the latest educational technologies for adjusting learning environments to be a lifelong learner.

About the Editor

Zeynep Tacgin has worked in the education technologies field for more than 12 years. She has been working on AR/VR/MR technology usage in education for 7 years. Her fields of interest are   educational, wearable   technologies, innovative learning   environments, technology integration to education, education management, and   policies, distance education, augmented reality, virtual reality, simulations, instructional   design, and material development.

Andrew Hagan has over 20-years’ experience as an academic and practitioner. An international awards judge, co-director of the Australian International Animation Festival (AIAF), Visual Effects Producer & Supervisor, Adobe Certified Expert (ACE), Autodesk Certified Instructor, with relevant degrees in BA (Fine Arts) (Honours) and BA (Television Production), he established Australia’s first undergraduate university degree dedicated to the art and science of Animation and Visual Effects. His latest work is in virtual technology that empowers education and benefits the public good.

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Global Learning at Small Institutions: Diverse Models and Creative Solutions

Abstract

Small liberal arts colleges face unique challenges integrating international curricula and global learning. However, those same challenges, including limitations on staff, resources, and administration, can often inspire creative solutions. This volume offers models for diverse, effective approaches to providing global learning curriculum, and instruction to undergraduates at small institutions.

About the Editor

Jann Purdy is Professor of French and Chair of International Studies at Pacific University, Oregon. She edited Language beyond the Classroom (2018), a volume addressing service-learning for world language programs at several universities and colleges. Dr Purdy created a program in intercultural communication at Pacific University, and co-developed the Global Scholars Program, a global-learning curriculum.

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Home-Schooling (Elective Home Education): Engaging Children with Learning

Abstract

With c. 66000 EHE children in the UK, this book will discuss reasons why families choose to home-educate their children; the demographics of EHE families (both nationally and within specific UK areas); support strategies for EHE by local authorities; how families are educating their children at home, including the approaches to learning, utilisation of EHE social networking and the use of informal learning contexts as means of enhancing EHE children’s learning engagement and progress.

About the Editor

Dr Roger Wood has enjoyed a wide range of roles as a scientist, conservationist and educator over the past 30 years. He is a Senior Lecturer in Education at Oxford Brookes University, having previously taught at two other universities. Prior to doctoral research at the University of Birmingham, he was Head of Science at two schools, and a Headteacher for 10 years. His current research investigates inquiry-based learning in science education, conservation education, elective home education, and the impact of confidence-informed motivation upon children’s engagement with social contexts.

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Key Aspects of Classroom Interaction in ELT

Abstract

In this collection, we will concentrate on classroom interactions when teaching English as a foreign or second language at the primary or secondary school level. There has been a great deal of work carried out in the area of classroom discourse, but this has mostly referred to general classroom discourse with no special emphasis on language teaching and learning. We believe that good quality classroom interaction promotes learners’ language acquisition. As such, this collection will explore classroom interaction in relation to both teachers and learners and investigate its various influences.

About the Editor

Lucie Betáková is an Associate Professor of English and Head of the English Department at the Faculty of Education of the University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic. She has taught ELT methodology to both pre-service and in-service teachers, and is the author of a number of publications, including Discourse and Interaction in English Language Teaching (2010), “Teacher Follow-up Move within Classroom Discourse” in The Impact of Applied Linguistics (2012), and “Supporting Language Acquisition through Teacher Questioning” in Learner Corpora and English Acquisition (A Collection of Studies) (2015).

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Re-examining Diversity and Social Justice in the Academy

Abstract

This collection will examine the notions of social justice and diversity and how they positively or negatively affect different areas of academic life. It will favour a critical approach which allows a diverse array of voices to be heard on this issue, from educators to independent thinkers, adopting different perspectives.

About the Editor

Alen Ontl is a writer, translator and independent scholar. His publications include the book A Comparative Analysis of the Great American and Arab Novel. In addition to his work in philology, he is currently working on his second book, a collection of philosophical aphorisms. His main interests include Modernist literature, systems theory, and philosophy.

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Using Augmented Reality (AR) to Promote Brain Literacy and Mental Health Awareness in Primary Education

Abstract

Augmented Reality (AR) based applications provide opportunities to present educational material in a unique way. This thesis explores the way AR aids the promotion of brain literacy and mental health awareness in primary education, specifically focusing on the parts of the brain involved in the stress response.

About the Editor

Maria Mattsson is a Helsinki-based neuropsychiatric mentor. Her focus is on emotional skills and creative methods. Dr Mallika Punukollu is a Consultant in CAMHS Psychiatry in Glasgow and a senior honorary clinical lecturer at Glasgow University. Together, they work towards accessible digital health through Safespot app and website.

(view call)


Sacred Groves: Culture and Conservation

Abstract

Sacred groves are specific forests usually associated with a presiding deity. As sites of natural resources with traditional knowledge systems, they play crucial roles in biodiversity conservation around the world. This volume focuses on the religio-cultural aspects of sacred groves, and explores the spiritual dimension of the environment in the face of contemporary issues concerning threatened ecosystems and climate change.

About the Editor

Dr Rena Laisram teaches at the Department of History of Gauhati University, India. She is the author of the books Religion in Early Assam: An Archaeological History (2019), Early Meitei History: Religion, Society and the Manipur Puyas (2009), and The Growth and Development of Meitei Nationality: A Historical Approach (1998). Her research interests include religion and society, oral history and community, gender studies, and issues of identity.

(view call)


Sustainability 2.0: Discourse and Practice in the Luxury World

Abstract

In 1987, the United Nations defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (Our Common Future, also known as the Brundtland Report).

In 2013, the luxury, sports, and lifestyle conglomerate PPR rebranded as Kering to signify its transformation and commitment to sustainability. Since then, a discourse about sustainability pervaded the luxury world, raising numerous questions about the compatibility between the two worlds.

The objective of this volume is to define a paradigm for sustainable luxury that takes into account enablers and constraints of the sector.

It will gather together contributions from different academic fields investigating the discursive practices within the world of luxury and its intersection with sustainability. Contributions from practitioners working within this space are also welcome.

About the Editor

Esterina Nervino is currently Assistant Professor at the Department of English and the Department of Marketing at the City University of Hong Kong, where she is also Associate Director of the Sales and Marketing Consulting Unit. She is Junior Adjunct Professor of Intercultural Communication and Language Variation at the Universita’ degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy, and a member of the Research Centre for Professional Communication in English at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and her research interests include social semiotics, multimodality, business communication, luxury studies in relation to art, space, sustainability, and retail experience.

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Current Approaches in Addiction Psychology

Abstract

Both behavioural and substance addictions are causing dramatic problems across the globe, having a negative effect on the health of young people worldwide. These addictions produce negative impacts not only on individuals, but also on societies. Therefore, we believe that the most substantial things experts must do in this area are to refresh the findings and practical techniques perpetually and complement information and findings supported by research, and in doing so we aim to contribute current methodology and support regulation of prevention approaches.

In this context, this volume shares current research findings and approaches about addiction psychology, from an international perspective. It aims to inform academics, practitioners and the general reader interested in the subject. This book attempts to cover different issues and aspects of addiction psychology from different methodological perspectives, providing general information on some traditional and contemporary addiction types. Academics and practitioners will also be able to gather up-to-date information about family approaches, attachment, mindfulness and motivational counselling, and their relations with addiction psychology.

About the Editor

Eda Ermagan is an Assistant Professor at Beykoz University, Turkey. She holds a PhD in Forensic Psychology, and her research interests include addiction psychology, eyewitness memory and trauma psychology. In addition to her academic career, she has also worked as a counselling psychologist and EMDR therapist.

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Digital Innovation to Promote Brain Literacy and Mental Health Awareness

Abstract

Digital innovation can be used as a tool to promote contemporary topics in teaching. As mental health becomes more recognised in the curriculum, ways to approach the topic broaden. This collection specifically looks into the promotion of brain literacy and mental health awareness in education with the help of accessible digital tools.

About the Editor

Maria Mattsson is a neuropsychiatric mentor, focusing on play, emotional awareness and creativity. She holds an MA in Psychology and an MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy.

Dr Mallika Punukollu is a Consultant in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Psychiatry in Glasgow. She is also a Senior Honorary Clinical Lecturer at Glasgow University.

Together, they work towards accessible digital health through the Safespot app and website.

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Forensic Psychiatry: Clinical and Ethical Approaches

Abstract

This collection includes themes related to the practice of forensic psychiatry in the criminal and civil spheres. Given some ethical peculiarities of forensic practice, which differ from clinical practice, this collection will include both approaches: The forensic practice of psychiatry and the ethical dilemmas that may arise throughout it.

About the Editor

Elias Abdalla-Filho is a clinical and forensic psychatrist, psychoanlyist with a pHd in Health Sciences (Bioethics) form the University of Brazil. He is now a member of the department of Ethics and Psychiatry in the Brazilian Association of Psychiatry.

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Translating Horror: Shadows on the Page and Screen

Abstract

This multidisciplinary volume, through both case studies and wider surveys of literary traditions in dialogue, engages the horror genre as it is transmitted and developed across languages. The second part of the book is particularly focused on ways in which stories and novels are adapted for the cinematic medium.

Translating Horror is interested in particular challenges that may be encountered in interlinguistic environments, for example, in rendering certain genre conventions; in early cinema practices; in more recent cultural economies of cinema remakes; and in how (pseudo-)translation and interpreting can be used as framing devices or become key parts of a plot).

About the Editor

Paschalis Nikolaou is Assistant Professor in Literary Translation at the Ionian University in Corfu, Greece. He has previously edited, among others, Translating Selves: Experience and Identity between Languages and Literatures (2008) and Encounters in Greek and Irish Literature: Creativity, Translations and Critical Perspectives (2020). His study The Return of Pytheas: Scenes from British and Greek Poetry in Dialogue was published in 2017. Most recently, he guest-edited an issue of Synthesis (12. 2019: “Recomposed: Anglophone Presences of Classical Literature”) and contributed essays to Anne Carson/Antiquity (2021) and The Cambridge Handbook to Translation (2022).

(view call)


Key Aspects of Classroom Interaction in ELT

Abstract

In this collection, we will concentrate on classroom interactions when teaching English as a foreign or second language at the primary or secondary school level. There has been a great deal of work carried out in the area of classroom discourse, but this has mostly referred to general classroom discourse with no special emphasis on language teaching and learning. We believe that good quality classroom interaction promotes learners’ language acquisition. As such, this collection will explore classroom interaction in relation to both teachers and learners and investigate its various influences.

About the Editor

Lucie Betáková is an Associate Professor of English and Head of the English Department at the Faculty of Education of the University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic. She has taught ELT methodology to both pre-service and in-service teachers, and is the author of a number of publications, including Discourse and Interaction in English Language Teaching (2010), “Teacher Follow-up Move within Classroom Discourse” in The Impact of Applied Linguistics (2012), and “Supporting Language Acquisition through Teacher Questioning” in Learner Corpora and English Acquisition (A Collection of Studies) (2015).

(view call)


Languages of Politics

Abstract

Depending on their gender, education, party or other affiliations, politicians tend to develop their “tribal language”, whose usage in the political arena serves to increase polarisation and create ideologically homogeneous neighbourhoods instead of democratically exchanged arguments. This collections explores the different languages spoken by politicians, how partisan neologisms are formed, and the effects of language polarisation.

About the Editor

Dragana Božić Lenard obtained her PhD in Linguistics and MA in English and Croatian Language and Literature from the University of Osijek, Croatia. Her doctoral dissertation dealt with gender differences in speeches made in the 113th United States Congress. Using computational, quantitative, and qualitative analyses, she has published several papers in the field of gender differences in speeches made in political settings. She currently works as an Assistant Professor at the University of Osijek, where she teaches English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses. Her research interests include ESP, sociolinguistics, and computational linguistics.

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Mind and Second Language Acquisition: Experimental Approaches

Abstract

The volume will focus on experimental designs that investigate second language acquisition using methods from various fields. These fields include, but are not limited to, psychology, neuroscience, education, biology, sociology, language pathology, and computer science.

About the Editor

Dr George Georgiou is a tenure-track Full-Time Faculty Member in Linguistics at the Department of Languages and Literature of the University of Nicosia, Cyprus, and he is the coordinator of the Cyprus Linguistics and the Humanities Research Group. He has previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher and Assistant Lecturer in the Department of General and Russian Linguistics of the Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia, as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Rehabilitation Science of Cyprus University of Technology, and as an Associate Lecturer in the Division of Linguistics of the University of Central Lancashire, UK. His research interests lie in the areas of phonetics, phonology, psycholinguistics, and second language acquisition. Dr Georgiou’s work has appeared in various high-impact, international journals, and he is the author of two monographs. He has twice received the Research Recognition Award from the University of Nicosia, and he has won three research grants. His work has also appeared in the reputable American magazine Forbes (2020) and has been covered by the Canadian national public broadcaster CBC (2021).

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Speech Perception and Production in L2

Abstract

This book is concerned with studying speech perception and production in an L2. The collection deals with segments, syllables as well as features above syllable level (suprasegmental level). The chapters that make up this volume describe careful empirical research conducted in Eastern Mediterranean countries such as Cyprus.

About the Editor

Elena Kkese (PhD Linguistics, MA Applied Linguistics, BA English Language and Literature, AFHEA) teaches at a tertiary level since 2007. She is the author of Identifying Plosives in L2 English and L2 Writing Assessment and has published extensively on L2 phonology, spelling, and writing. 

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Crisis in Contemporary British Fiction

Abstract

This collection of critical essay explores how contemporary British authors engage with the theme of crisis in their fiction (as apparent in novels and short stories by Kazuo Ishiguro, Julian Barnes, A S Byatt, Ian McEwan, Graham Swift, Hilary Mantel, Zadie Smith, Pat Barker, and Martin Amis, among others). ‘Crisis’ can be investigated not only as informing any aspect of fiction involving sociopolitical and cultural systems, but also as a mode of challenge to established power structures and modes of representation across narrative traditions.

About the Editor

Anastasia Logotheti, PhD, is Professor of English at Deree College, the American College of Greece. She has published several articles in The Literary Encyclopedia on Kazuo Ishiguro, Graham Swift, and Ian McEwan. Her most recent publications are the articles “Alterity in E M Forster’s ‘The Other Boat’” in Language and Literary Studies of Warsaw (2021) and “Digital Encounters with Shakespeare” in Research in Drama Education (2020), as well as chapters in the volumes Crossing Borders in Gender and Culture (2018), Reading Graham Swift (2019), and London: Myths, Tales and Urban Legends (2021).

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Mapping Medieval Literature

Abstract

This collection explores medieval literature from the perspective of spatial or cartographic readings. Topoanalytic readings of major literary works or spatial discussions of illuminated manuscripts of major texts from the long middle ages (6th to 16th cenury) are welcome.

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About the Editor

John R. Gilhooly is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Theology at Cedarville University where he directs the Honors Program.

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Parallels and Tensions: F. Scott Fitzgerald in Dialogue

Abstract

This collection aims to better understand the lasting significance of F. Scott Fitzgerald's oeuvre and explore possible parallels and tensions between Fitzgerald and other writers and artists through essays that analyse his writings from new perspectives and expand upon connections between his work and other literary and artistic expressions.

About the Editor

Roberta Fabbri Viscardi holds a PhD in English Language and Literary Studies from the University of São Paulo, Brazil. She is a literary translator and literature teacher, and is currently an independent scholar. Her research interests include American realism and modernisms, 20th century artistic avant-gardes, and the relationship between literature and the other arts. She is a member of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society and a peer-reviewer for literature journals in Brazil.

Marcela Lanius holds a PhD in Language and Translation Studies from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Currently an independent scholar and translator, she has been developing various research works within the field of translation studies, writing about feminist literary criticism, literary translation, American theatre, and English-language modernisms. She is a member of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society and Assistant Editor of the academic journal Tradução em Revista [Translation in Review].

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Violence in the Plays of Sarah Kane

Abstract

Violence is a key aspect of Sarah Kane’s oeuvre. This volume will shed light on her output from different phenomenological, psychological, and social viewpoints, dealing with psychological, physical, verbal, and sexual violence in her plays as a manifestation of a phenomenon that pervades modern society in troubling ways. It will answer why violence pervades the works of Sarah Kane, who, sadly, took her own life in a violent way.

About the Editor

Raad Kareem Abd-Aun received his PhD in English Literature from the University of Baghdad in 2011, and is a Faculty Member at the University of Babylon, Iraq. His main research interests are postcolonial literature and literary theory, modern drama, and Iraqi literature. In 2014, he published a volume of poems.

(view call)


Translating Horror: Shadows on the Page and Screen

Abstract

This multidisciplinary volume, through both case studies and wider surveys of literary traditions in dialogue, engages the horror genre as it is transmitted and developed across languages. The second part of the book is particularly focused on ways in which stories and novels are adapted for the cinematic medium.

Translating Horror is interested in particular challenges that may be encountered in interlinguistic environments, for example, in rendering certain genre conventions; in early cinema practices; in more recent cultural economies of cinema remakes; and in how (pseudo-)translation and interpreting can be used as framing devices or become key parts of a plot).

About the Editor

Paschalis Nikolaou is Assistant Professor in Literary Translation at the Ionian University in Corfu, Greece. He has previously edited, among others, Translating Selves: Experience and Identity between Languages and Literatures (2008) and Encounters in Greek and Irish Literature: Creativity, Translations and Critical Perspectives (2020). His study The Return of Pytheas: Scenes from British and Greek Poetry in Dialogue was published in 2017. Most recently, he guest-edited an issue of Synthesis (12. 2019: “Recomposed: Anglophone Presences of Classical Literature”) and contributed essays to Anne Carson/Antiquity (2021) and The Cambridge Handbook to Translation (2022).

(view call)


Fear, Risk and Safety: Post-Millennial Cultures of Fear in Literature

Abstract

In an essay on Karl Kraus, Walter Benjamin wrote in 1931 about the press being an instrument of power, which acquires its value through the character of the power that it serves. The proliferation of (social) media and available venues to circulate information in our times has created partisan cultures in which each side creates a narrative in which the other side, overtly or covertly, is dismissed, belittled, discredited, or demonized. Examples of such discursive polarizations include 9/11, Trumpism (MAGA), climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

The divided, inimical discursive environment invites a focus on risk, safety, and fear. It is a common human behavior to try to avoid risks to stay safe. When discourses underscore how making the wrong (political, social, or environmental) choice will increase risk and minimize safety, the element of fear is added and complicates matters.

The words “risk,” “safety,” and “fear” have been used to define our contemporary age and they have also been construed as a valid narrative in the human sciences against which most other narratives, imaginative or otherwise, can be read. This volume will bring together original articles studying cultures of fear in literature with a specific emphasis on post-millennial texts and will investigate such subtopics and fields as post-millennial political fiction, post-postmodern rewritings, “the culture of fear,” “world risk theory,” the postcolonial novel, post-humanist writing, trauma narratives, literary disaster discourses, environmental literature, apocalyptic scenarios, and personal apocalypse writing in the 21st century.

About the Editor

Mustafa Kirca is Assistant Professor of English in the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies at Çankaya University, Turkey. He holds an MA and PhD in English literature from Middle East Technical University, Turkey. He conducts research on translation and comparative studies, the contemporary novel, translation theory and postcolonial criticism. He co-edited Multicultural Narratives: Traces and Perspectives (2018), and Mapping Cultural Identities and Intersections: Imagological Readings (2019).

Adelheid Rundholz holds a PhD in Comparative Literature and in Romance Languages and Literatures (French) from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Her research interests are literature of migration, the novel genre, literary theory, world literature, aesthetics and language, comparative literature, and translation. She is the author of numerous publications, including articles on the graphic novel and cinema. She is co-editor of a forthcoming book on contemporary Lithuanian literature and participates in many conferences both in the USA and in Europe.

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Rational Use of The Results of Mathematical Modelling

Abstract

Mathematical methods are currently used in almost all areas of human activity. The main obstacle to the successful use of the results of mathematical simulation in practical problems is the discrepancy between the simulation results and experimental data. If the specified correspondence is fulfilled, then we will assume that the simulation results are adequate for the experiment. If there is no adequacy, then the simulation results cannot be of practical value. The problem can be solved by constructing special (adequate) mathematical descriptions of physical processes (AMD). This volume is devoted to methods of constructing AMD.

About the Editor

Yurii Menshykov is Senior Researcher and Associate Professor at Dnipro National University, Ukraine. His research interests include the control systems, differential equations, inverse problems, and mathematical modeling. He is the author and co-author of four monographs and about 400 journal articles. His most recent publication is Synthesis of Adequate Mathematical Descriptions of Physical Processes (2020).

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Resilience in Smart Grid Electrical Protection

Abstract

Electrical protection in smart grid is one of the main concerns due to consecutive switching of energy resources. In order to make a self-healing protection compatible with smart grid requirements it is necessary to establish a protection and control center comprising real time simulation, protection design and configuration and online setting adaptation of protective relays. Among this, adaptive algorithms to recognize and distinguish different kinds of abnormalities to control operation of protective relays are also seems to be necessary. The algorithms also communicate with protection simulation and design center to transfer the status and receive a response to make a correct decision to maintain stability and availability of power sources in smart grid.

About the Editor

Salman Rezaei received a B.Sc. in electrical engineering from Mehriz-Azad University, Mehriz, Yazd, Iran in 2010. He has been working in Kerman Combined Cycle Power Plant since 2005. He is an electrical engineer of technical office. His activities include protective relaying, testing electrical devices, generator transformer and protective relays, electrical studies and simulation of distributed resources and electrical projects.

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Languages of Politics

Abstract

Depending on their gender, education, party or other affiliations, politicians tend to develop their “tribal language”, whose usage in the political arena serves to increase polarisation and create ideologically homogeneous neighbourhoods instead of democratically exchanged arguments. This collections explores the different languages spoken by politicians, how partisan neologisms are formed, and the effects of language polarisation.

About the Editor

Dragana Božić Lenard obtained her PhD in Linguistics and MA in English and Croatian Language and Literature from the University of Osijek, Croatia. Her doctoral dissertation dealt with gender differences in speeches made in the 113th United States Congress. Using computational, quantitative, and qualitative analyses, she has published several papers in the field of gender differences in speeches made in political settings. She currently works as an Assistant Professor at the University of Osijek, where she teaches English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses. Her research interests include ESP, sociolinguistics, and computational linguistics.

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“Russia’s ‘National Idea’ (Evolving Self-Identification) in the 21st Century”

Abstract

This collection of essays examines the latest thinking on Russia’s developing national identity in the 21st century by leading Russian and non-Russian social philosophers, political scientists, and cultural figures, as well as the actual effect their thinking has on Russia’s current and future internal and external policies. Special attention is expected to be paid to the cultural aspects of Russia’s “national idea.”

Key words: national identity (“national idea”); cultural codes; culture; civilization; collective memory; historical mission.

About the Editor

Alexander Burak is an Associate Professor of Russian Studies in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida, USA. He holds a Master’s in Translation Studies from the Translation and Interpretation Faculty (Division) of the Moscow Linguistic University and a PhD in Sociology from Lomonosov Moscow State University. He has published five books and numerous articles on intercultural communication and Russia’s national self-identification.

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Voice of Emigrants: Media of Political Emigrants from Central and Eastern Europe after 1945

Abstract

The aim of the work is to analyze the media used by political emigrants from Central Europe after 1945. We want to answer the following questions: What types of media did emigrants have? What they preached in them? Were the media used more to justify their activities towards Western societies or towards their own emigrant communities and nations behind the Iron Curtain?

About the Editor

Arkadiusz Indraszczyk, historian and political scientist, habilitated doctor, professor at the Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, senior curator at the Museum of the History of the Polish People's Movement in Warsaw, conducts research on political emigration from Central Europe after 1945, political parties, European integration and collective security systems in Europe.

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Current Approaches in Addiction Psychology

Abstract

Both behavioural and substance addictions are causing dramatic problems across the globe, having a negative effect on the health of young people worldwide. These addictions produce negative impacts not only on individuals, but also on societies. Therefore, we believe that the most substantial things experts must do in this area are to refresh the findings and practical techniques perpetually and complement information and findings supported by research, and in doing so we aim to contribute current methodology and support regulation of prevention approaches.

In this context, this volume shares current research findings and approaches about addiction psychology, from an international perspective. It aims to inform academics, practitioners and the general reader interested in the subject. This book attempts to cover different issues and aspects of addiction psychology from different methodological perspectives, providing general information on some traditional and contemporary addiction types. Academics and practitioners will also be able to gather up-to-date information about family approaches, attachment, mindfulness and motivational counselling, and their relations with addiction psychology.

About the Editor

Eda Ermagan is an Assistant Professor at Beykoz University, Turkey. She holds a PhD in Forensic Psychology, and her research interests include addiction psychology, eyewitness memory and trauma psychology. In addition to her academic career, she has also worked as a counselling psychologist and EMDR therapist.

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Digital Innovation to Promote Brain Literacy and Mental Health Awareness

Abstract

Digital innovation can be used as a tool to promote contemporary topics in teaching. As mental health becomes more recognised in the curriculum, ways to approach the topic broaden. This collection specifically looks into the promotion of brain literacy and mental health awareness in education with the help of accessible digital tools.

About the Editor

Maria Mattsson is a neuropsychiatric mentor, focusing on play, emotional awareness and creativity. She holds an MA in Psychology and an MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy.

Dr Mallika Punukollu is a Consultant in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Psychiatry in Glasgow. She is also a Senior Honorary Clinical Lecturer at Glasgow University.

Together, they work towards accessible digital health through the Safespot app and website.

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Fear, Risk and Safety: Post-Millennial Cultures of Fear in Literature

Abstract

In an essay on Karl Kraus, Walter Benjamin wrote in 1931 about the press being an instrument of power, which acquires its value through the character of the power that it serves. The proliferation of (social) media and available venues to circulate information in our times has created partisan cultures in which each side creates a narrative in which the other side, overtly or covertly, is dismissed, belittled, discredited, or demonized. Examples of such discursive polarizations include 9/11, Trumpism (MAGA), climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

The divided, inimical discursive environment invites a focus on risk, safety, and fear. It is a common human behavior to try to avoid risks to stay safe. When discourses underscore how making the wrong (political, social, or environmental) choice will increase risk and minimize safety, the element of fear is added and complicates matters.

The words “risk,” “safety,” and “fear” have been used to define our contemporary age and they have also been construed as a valid narrative in the human sciences against which most other narratives, imaginative or otherwise, can be read. This volume will bring together original articles studying cultures of fear in literature with a specific emphasis on post-millennial texts and will investigate such subtopics and fields as post-millennial political fiction, post-postmodern rewritings, “the culture of fear,” “world risk theory,” the postcolonial novel, post-humanist writing, trauma narratives, literary disaster discourses, environmental literature, apocalyptic scenarios, and personal apocalypse writing in the 21st century.

About the Editor

Mustafa Kirca is Assistant Professor of English in the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies at Çankaya University, Turkey. He holds an MA and PhD in English literature from Middle East Technical University, Turkey. He conducts research on translation and comparative studies, the contemporary novel, translation theory and postcolonial criticism. He co-edited Multicultural Narratives: Traces and Perspectives (2018), and Mapping Cultural Identities and Intersections: Imagological Readings (2019).

Adelheid Rundholz holds a PhD in Comparative Literature and in Romance Languages and Literatures (French) from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Her research interests are literature of migration, the novel genre, literary theory, world literature, aesthetics and language, comparative literature, and translation. She is the author of numerous publications, including articles on the graphic novel and cinema. She is co-editor of a forthcoming book on contemporary Lithuanian literature and participates in many conferences both in the USA and in Europe.

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Re-examining Diversity and Social Justice in the Academy

Abstract

This collection will examine the notions of social justice and diversity and how they positively or negatively affect different areas of academic life. It will favour a critical approach which allows a diverse array of voices to be heard on this issue, from educators to independent thinkers, adopting different perspectives.

About the Editor

Alen Ontl is a writer, translator and independent scholar. His publications include the book A Comparative Analysis of the Great American and Arab Novel. In addition to his work in philology, he is currently working on his second book, a collection of philosophical aphorisms. His main interests include Modernist literature, systems theory, and philosophy.

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work and Business

Abstract

The future of work and business is being disrupted and transformed at a frightening pace – robotics and artificial intelligence are synergistically merging to radically improve corporate productivity; to increase low-paid unskilled jobs (e.g., ‘gig’ economy); to obliterate higher-paid professional and unskilled jobs; and consequently, to worsen existing knavish social inequalities. The need for human-centred action is palpable, in order to stifle the looming adverse, or even catastrophic social affects; and action is needed by all stakeholders - from government policies that allow companies to prosper and universities to innovate; to universities accepting social responsibility to supply job-ready graduates for a new world of work; to agile companies embracing new technological tools for human-machine synergies; and to individuals accepting personal responsibility to embark on a new era and philosophy of life-long learning in an ambiguous work milieu. This book is an exploration of what has been called the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’; how that revolution will likely impact the future of work and business; and what stakeholders can do to foster antifragility in an increasingly volatile and uncertain world.

About the Editor

Victor Egan has a background in engineering, project management, and university administration. He has extensive international experience, having consulted to the United Nations in Saudi Arabia, and to governments in Africa. Most recently, he was CEO of a start-up company specialising in courses in artificial intelligence and cyber security.

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Drifting through Wonderlands: The City as Performance

Abstract

With 70% of the world’s population expected to live in urban environments by 2050, the city is poised to become the most significant space in shaping personal and communal identity. As contemporary cities become “event destinations”, a dialogue is emerging between the performing arts, the urban context, and social fabric. This volume will document and contribute to this dialogue from multi-disciplinary viewpoints, highlighting innovatory practices and the challenges a ‘performative’ urban environment poses, not least in the wake of the current pandemic, changing work practices, and new perspectives on urban living.

About the Editor

John C. Green is Professor of Theatre at Columbia College, Chicago, where he teaches theory and experimental performance practice in the department’s international graduate program in European Devised Performance. His most recent book is Mnemodrama in Action: An Introduction to the Theatre of Alessandro Fersen (2019).

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