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Friedrich Nietzsche's Birthday - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 15th of October, join Cambridge Scholars in marking the birthday of one of the most important philosophers ever to have lived – Friedrich Nietzsche. Born on this day in 1844 in the small town of Röcken in Germany, Nietzsche went on to become one of the towering figures of European philosophy towards the end of the nineteenth century. His concepts of slave morality, the will to power, and the Übermensch remain enormously influential in a number of academic disciplines, and his shadow continues to loom large in a number of debates within analytic and continental philosophy.

At Cambridge Scholars we are proud to be at the forefront of new, innovative interpretations of Nietzsche’s oeuvre. Not only do we publish the acclaimed Nietzsche Now series, but over the last twelve months we have published a number of books that have broken new ground in the study of his thinking and its contemporary relevance. We are therefore offering a 50% discount on five of these titles in October. Not only this, throughout the month our authors and Editorial Advisory Board members will be posting short articles on Nietzsche on our blog. We were also delighted to sponsor the 24th International Conference of the Friedrich Nietzsche Society at Newcastle University last month, which you can read more about by clicking here.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code NIETZSCHE18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2018.

Friedrich Nietzsche and European Nihilism is a thorough study of Nietzsche’s thoughts on nihilism, the history of the concept, the different ways in which he tries to explain his ideas on nihilism, the way these ideas were received in the 20th century, and, ultimately, what these ideas should mean to us. It begins with an exploration of how we can understand the strange situation that Nietzsche, about 130 years ago, predicted that nihilism would break through one or two centuries from then, and why, despite the philosopher describing it as the greatest catastrophe that could befall humankind, we hardly seem to be aware of it, let alone be frightened by it. The book shows that most of us are still living within the old frameworks of faith, and, therefore, can hardly imagine what it would mean if the idea of God (as the summit and summary of all our epistemic, moral, and esthetic beliefs) would become unbelievable. 

Nietzsche and Phenomenology brings together original essays on a wide variety of topics in the broad area of ‘Nietzsche and Phenomenology’. Some of these papers take a thematic approach, thinking through key issues that connect or divide Nietzsche and phenomenology, while others approach the conjunction of the title via an encounter between Nietzsche and one of the central figures of the phenomenological tradition or other relevant philosophers. In either case, new and often surpising connections are uncovered in many of these essays, while others bring out the profound differences and discontinuities between aspects of Nietzsche’s project and the projects of phenomenologists.

Nietzsche and Transhumanism: Precursor or Enemy? deals with the question of whether Nietzsche can be seen as a precursor of transhumanism or not. Debates on the topic have existed for some years, particularly in the Journal of Evolution and Technology and The Agonist. This book combines existing papers, from these journals, with new material, to highlight some of the important issues surrounding this argument. The collection addresses a variety of issues to show whether or not there is a close connection between transhumanist concerns for progress and technology and Nietzsche’s ideas.

Nietzsche's Will to Power: Eagles, Lions, and Serpents represents a contribution to Nietzschean scholarship in its analysis of the concept of power as preliminary to addressing Nietzsche’s psychological version of will to power. It advances a fresh interpretation of will to power that connects it to the meaning of human life, and, in so doing, the author addresses major questions such as: What does will to power designate? What is its status, epistemologically and metaphysically? How persuasive is will to power as an explanation of human instincts and as the lynchpin of a way of life? As all human beings embody will to power, the book concludes that we should distinguish three varieties: robust, moderate, and attenuated will to power. Only by doing this, can we understand and evaluate will to power concretely.

In an age of ecological decay, Western ontological and epistemological assumptions have to be revisited. The Places of God in an Age of Re-Embodiments: What is Culture? offers such a revision. It opens with a critical analysis of the paradigm of sustainable development and problematically situates it within the ecocidal trajectory of Western metaphysics. In search of some tools for examining the ecological conundrum, the book develops a pool of new categories of knowledge called “transpositions”. Though of cross-disciplinary nature, this work must be situated within the tradition of the post-Kantian critique of reason. To develop its own framework of analysis, it relies heavily upon Nietzsche’s oeuvre and that of part of his entourage. Major inputs also come from the work of the ecophilosopher of science Patrick Curry and ecofeminism at large.

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