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Blog posts of '2018' 'September'

Friedrich Nietzsche's Birthday - Cambridge Scholars Publishing 27 September 2018

On the 15th of October, join Cambridge Scholars in marking the birthday of one of the most important philosophers ever to have lived – Friedrich Nietzsche. Born on this day in 1844 in the small town of Röcken in Germany, Nietzsche went on to become one of the towering figures of European philosophy towards the end of the nineteenth century. His concepts of slave morality, the will to power, and the Übermensch remain enormously influential in a number of academic disciplines, and his shadow continues to loom large in a number of debates within analytic and continental philosophy.

At Cambridge Scholars we are proud to be at the forefront of new, innovative interpretations of Nietzsche’s oeuvre. Not only do we publish the acclaimed Nietzsche Now series, but over the last twelve months we have published a number of books that have broken new ground in the study of his thinking and its contemporary relevance. We are therefore offering a 50% discount on five of these titles in October. Not only this, throughout the month our authors and Editorial Advisory Board members will be posting short articles on Nietzsche on our blog. We were also delighted to sponsor the 24th International Conference of the Friedrich Nietzsche Society at Newcastle University last month, which you can read more about by clicking here.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code NIETZSCHE18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2018.

Friedrich Nietzsche and European Nihilism is a thorough study of Nietzsche’s thoughts on nihilism, the history of the concept, the different ways in which he tries to explain his ideas on nihilism, the way these ideas were received in the 20th century, and, ultimately, what these ideas should mean to us. It begins with an exploration of how we can understand the strange situation that Nietzsche, about 130 years ago, predicted that nihilism would break through one or two centuries from then, and why, despite the philosopher describing it as the greatest catastrophe that could befall humankind, we hardly seem to be aware of it, let alone be frightened by it. The book shows that most of us are still living within the old frameworks of faith, and, therefore, can hardly imagine what it would mean if the idea of God (as the summit and summary of all our epistemic, moral, and esthetic beliefs) would become unbelievable. 

Nietzsche and Phenomenology brings together original essays on a wide variety of topics in the broad area of ‘Nietzsche and Phenomenology’. Some of these papers take a thematic approach, thinking through key issues that connect or divide Nietzsche and phenomenology, while others approach the conjunction of the title via an encounter between Nietzsche and one of the central figures of the phenomenological tradition or other relevant philosophers. In either case, new and often surpising connections are uncovered in many of these essays, while others bring out the profound differences and discontinuities between aspects of Nietzsche’s project and the projects of phenomenologists.

Nietzsche and Transhumanism: Precursor or Enemy? deals with the question of whether Nietzsche can be seen as a precursor of transhumanism or not. Debates on the topic have existed for some years, particularly in the Journal of Evolution and Technology and The Agonist. This book combines existing papers, from these journals, with new material, to highlight some of the important issues surrounding this argument. The collection addresses a variety of issues to show whether or not there is a close connection between transhumanist concerns for progress and technology and Nietzsche’s ideas.

Nietzsche's Will to Power: Eagles, Lions, and Serpents represents a contribution to Nietzschean scholarship in its analysis of the concept of power as preliminary to addressing Nietzsche’s psychological version of will to power. It advances a fresh interpretation of will to power that connects it to the meaning of human life, and, in so doing, the author addresses major questions such as: What does will to power designate? What is its status, epistemologically and metaphysically? How persuasive is will to power as an explanation of human instincts and as the lynchpin of a way of life? As all human beings embody will to power, the book concludes that we should distinguish three varieties: robust, moderate, and attenuated will to power. Only by doing this, can we understand and evaluate will to power concretely.

In an age of ecological decay, Western ontological and epistemological assumptions have to be revisited. The Places of God in an Age of Re-Embodiments: What is Culture? offers such a revision. It opens with a critical analysis of the paradigm of sustainable development and problematically situates it within the ecocidal trajectory of Western metaphysics. In search of some tools for examining the ecological conundrum, the book develops a pool of new categories of knowledge called “transpositions”. Though of cross-disciplinary nature, this work must be situated within the tradition of the post-Kantian critique of reason. To develop its own framework of analysis, it relies heavily upon Nietzsche’s oeuvre and that of part of his entourage. Major inputs also come from the work of the ecophilosopher of science Patrick Curry and ecofeminism at large.

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Book of the Month - October 2018 27 September 2018

Our October Book of the Month is Reflections on Contemporary Values, Beliefs and Behaviours: The Adventures of an Enquiring Mind by Prasanna Gautam.

In a previous life, Prasanna Gautam was a distinguished physician and teacher of medicine at the University Group of Hospitals in Aberdeen, Scotland. Now he is pursuing his lifelong interests in Aryan history, ancient Sanskrit, and philosophy, and in March of this year published Reflections on Contemporary Values, Beliefs and Behaviours: The Adventures of an Enquiring Mind with Cambridge Scholars, an extraordinary journey through the deepest and most subtle philosophical crypts. Gautam has also translated the Rig Veda into English, and has written, edited, and translated widely across Nepali, Hindi, Sanskrit, and English.

Although embedded firmly within philosophical traditions, the book is akin to the great musings of Seneca or Marcus Aurelius, one that takes us by the hand and guides us gently through topics such as superstition, religion, sexuality, and happiness. It invites us to consider how we can live better lives, not by telling us what that our lives should be, but by encouraging us to think more deeply about the question ourselves.  


This book is a unique presentation of common but highly important issues that affect us all deeply. These are illustrated with personal anecdotes to which the readers can relate and compare with their own experiences in life. Each chapter is independent and presented in a conversational manner which makes reading easy. The book deals with a wide range of subjects, such as sex and sexuality, euthanasia, self-confidence, superstition, religion, evolution, parenting, conflicts, leadership, and the interpretation of scriptures, among others.

In addition to presenting the essence of many philosophical concepts and contrasting them with scientific evidence, the book asserts that our world has never before been richer and more technically advanced, but that our unthinking brains have precipitated unhappiness, conflicts, poverty, greed, crime and selfishness. A book of huge interest generally, this is also useful as a handy source of information for the students of humanities, the linguists and translators of ancient languages. 


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this book throughout October. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMOCT18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2018.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


"This is an impressive book covering a very wide range of topics. In reading this book you will be both entertained and stimulated. The author tries successfully to marry the informal with the formal and succeeds in producing a text which gains your attention and retains your interest. In my view, the overriding objective of the author is to stimulate the reader to think. Yes, he has things to say, points to make and theses to argue for which he thinks are important and hopefully you will agree with, but more fundamentally he wants to ignite enquiring minds, prepared to engage in rational debate and discussion. The author does not want disciples but fellow travellers, who see value in challenging conventions and commonly held beliefs and refuse to live the ‘unthinking life’."

--Dr Terry McKnight, Ulster University

"How often is it that we do things because that was the done thing, followed because everyone else has?  We automatically say or do things without thinking about it and rarely listen with attention. Dr Guatam has asked the questions that have often been at the back of our minds. This well researched book makes us think about the why and the so what. We may not necessarily agree with all the ideas, but they give rise to deeper thinking of our own truths and principles."

--Hema Kamath

"[T]his book is a must to read for everyone who desires to know what life is all about. It is lucid and inspirational."

--Dr. K.S.Sangunni, Former Professor, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

"What should a good non-fiction book provide?  Interest, information, education (for those willing to accept it), entertainment, food for thought  –  to mention but a few. In this book, Prasanna Gautam meets all the above criteria, and many more, and tackles a formidable bank of questions and themes via such media as personal experience, common sense, history, religion and culture."

--William Burnett

"Once I started reading the book, I had difficulty putting it down. The flow and compelling arguments that Prasanna Gautam has made, chapter after chapter, albeit exploring different issues, makes it informative, interesting and educative. It is filled with knowledge synthesised through the centuries. [...] The author has succeeded in tying many loose ends and wild assumptions about ancient Indian literature and Aryan civilisation. The book makes an interesting reading and a great learning experience particularly because of the way the author entwines his own personal experiences in different phases, different circumstances and different places about many common issues, e.g. sex, paradoxes related to our brain, retirement, superstition, euthanasia, the reality about rebirth and so on." 

--Prakash Khanal

"Every now and then in our reading we come across a book which is like no other we have read but makes us pause and become aware that it has changed our perceptions in some way usually for the better. Dr Gautam’s  ”Reflexions on Contemporary Values, Beliefs and Behaviours” is just such a book. [...] The “reflections” which the author expresses are frequently accompanied by questions which invite the reader to answer and perhaps re-exam his own standpoint. Although, for the most part, I agreed with most of Dr Gautam’s views there were times when I encountered those different from mine but I was quietly led to change my views and scarcely noticed it. It is a pleasant “adventure” to do so and a necessary one to embark upon.  As Plato recalls Socrates speech at his trial “The unexamined life is not worth living”."

--Ronald Caie

"Something of an absorption of thought and practice, Reflections on Contemporary Values, Beliefs and Behaviours is a rewarding read. Within its gentle confines, Reflections on Contemporary Values, Beliefs and Behaviours drops us bit by but into a significant bundle of important life events and issues―retirement―euthanasia―healing and violence, among them. The book discusses not just the attitudes of today, but looks far over our shoulders, and most especially into the disparate hymns and other writings from ancient India. Prasanna Gautam does a good job in capturing all that he can in as many light brush strokes as he does, for this must be the only way to try and gather the multifold and endless material that encompasses contemporary and ancient life. The sample size is fair as he covers a lot of ground! That is why the book possibly travels away from the experiences that are more commonly yours and mine―which it does very well―and becomes a more personal journey, the author’s own road to discovery."

--Peter Burnett


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - October 2018 27 September 2018

This month, our Editorial Advisory Board member Dr Michele Fontefrancesco has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’ – a very special autobiographical reflection published in 2015 by Gerald Mars. Michele is a social anthropologist who currently serves as a Research Fellow at the University of Gastronomic Sciences, Italy. His research analyses local development in rural and urban communities, with a particular interest in the relationship between the global economy and local areas. He has argued for the importance of cultural heritage, crafts, and local production specialisation as fundamental elements in the definition of local resilience. In 2013 he published The End of the City of Gold? Industry and Economic Crisis in an Italian Jewellery Town with Cambridge Scholars, a culmination of many years work into these topics.

We are offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Michele’s choice. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABOCT18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2018.

Dr Michele Fontefrancesco’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Becoming an Anthropologist: A Memoir and a Guide to Anthropology

Author: Gerald Mars

Mars’ graphic and often vivid narrative can be read simply as the anecdotal memoirs of an anthropologist. The experiences he recounts are sometimes hilarious, touch occasionally on the dangerous, and are always sensitively and expertly explored.


"This book is the story of a life and a brilliant career that proceeds from a simple question, which many students ask when they start their studies in anthropology: ‘how can a person become an anthropologist?’

Each of us who work in academia and who lead new cohorts of students in the exploration of anthropology struggle to form a decent and straightforward answer to this question. We know it is not a matter of academic degrees, erudite readings, or sitting on a comfortable armchair. As Gerald Mars shows, it is primarily the result of everyday practice and experience churned with deep reflexivity. Mars’ autobiographical narration shows the experience gained after youth, and how it creates the fertile ground on which anthropological thought can mature.

The book also offers a number of examples for better appreciating the application of anthropological analysis in the contemporary world. The autobiography, in fact, becomes a form of self-ethnography, within which Mars discusses his upbringing and lived social contexts – from the streets of Manchester and Blackpool, to the Army, to different academic institutions on both sides of the Atlantic.

The book will suit the tastes of less experienced readers and students, those who want to better understand what anthropology is and how it can be useful in comprehending our contemporary societies. It will also be of use to trained scholars who want to deepen their own anthropological educations." 


For further information on Dr Fontefrancesco, please click here.


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Featured Review - The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive 27 September 2018

Publishing with Cambridge Scholars is not an end in itself; instead, we recognise that the publication of a book is only the beginning of its long lifespan. Books not only need to be read, but they need to be appreciated, commented upon, and used as springboards for further research. As a result, we work hard to ensure that reviews of our books appear in cutting-edge, high-impact factor academic journals.

This month we are delighted to share news of a new review published in Contemporary Women’s Writing, a journal devoted to critically assessing writing by women authors who have published from 1970 to the present day. It is a journal that seeks to highlight the new and provocative in women’s writing, and it is therefore entirely appropriate that they have reviewed Gillian Alban’s The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive. Recently published in a new paperback edition, the book is a kaleidoscopic analysis of the different appearances of the figure of Medusa in historical and contemporary writing.

Written by Mine Özyurt Kiliç from the Department of Comparative Literature at Harvard University, the conclusion of the review reads as follows:


"What makes the study exceptional is the passionate voice of a feminist scholar who wants to reach those outside academia. Apparently, with such an intention in mind, Alban often inserts quick explication of the complex theories and discussions she employs in her reading, as well as helpful yet sometimes digressive plot summaries. [...] At times, the writer’s focus shifts from a comprehensive study of a theme through various texts to an analysis of a single work; however, that each subsection starts and ends with a comparative outlook at the texts under discussion provides a consolidation of her intense writing. With the titans of the contemporary women’s writing in her cup, Alban not only offers a kaleidoscopic view of the Medusa figure but also gives her reader a kaleidoscope through which s/he can delve into the myriad ways s/he is constructed in this patriarchal culture."

– Mine Özyurt Kiliç, Department of Comparative Literature, Harvard University, Contemporary Women's Writing (2018)


Alban’s book is available until to purchase now directly from Cambridge Scholars. Please click here to see more, and to read a 30 page excerpt from the book including the table of contents.

We are always very happy to hear from authors with reviews of their titles and have published an ever-increasing number of reviews on our website. Being well-reviewed is a strong selling point for any book, and at Cambridge Scholars we have a number of ways in which we can help authors and editors to this end.

In the first instance, following publication our dedicated Reviews Editor will contact individuals and publications from our wide-ranging list of contacts. We have up to 20 review copies to send directly to any interested scholars or publications as standard. We appreciate that our authors have specialist knowledge in their subject areas, and we always welcome suggestions of potential reviewers both during and after publication.

For more information on the post-publication process, please visit our dedicated Post-Publication page by clicking here or email marketing@cambridgescholars.com.

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Meet our Authors: Tetiana Dombrovan - September 2018 12 September 2018

Tetiana Dombrovan is Professor at Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, Ukraine, where she teaches English grammar, the history of the English language, and linguistic synergetics. She received her PhD in the grammatical classification of the English verb and her DSc in the synergetic modelling of English language development from Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University in 1996 and 2014, respectively.

In February 2018, Tetiana published her first book with Cambridge Scholars Publishing, An Introduction to Linguistic SynergeticsThe book is an explication of a new multidisciplinary approach to language studies that views human language as an open, dynamic, non-linear, and self-organising system.

Special emphasis is laid on a variety of change rates on different language levels, and as a result the book sheds new light on language development and permits better descriptions of phase transitions, or reconfigurations, of language as a synergetic megasystem.


Tetiana describes her experience of working with Cambridge Scholars, having previously published a number of books with other publishers:

“I would like to express my deepest gratitude to Cambridge Scholars Publishing for their warm welcome, politeness, and patience throughout the whole process of turning my manuscript into a wonderful book.  It was a great pleasure to work with CSP, indeed, from the very beginning. The team are dedicated, helpful, understanding, and extremely professional, making each stage of the publication process extremely pleasant and seamless. I am sincere in saying that the publishing process has been beyond all of my expectations, as I have already published three books with other publishers.  I must say, CSP is the best and I am happy to recommend Cambridge Scholars Publishing to all of my colleagues.  I wish all the best to CSP and look forward to further cooperation.”


As part of the Meet our Authors campaign, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on Tetiana’s book, An Introduction to Linguistic Synergetics. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code MOASEP18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 15th October 2018.


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Meet our Authors: Kleio Akrivou - September 2018 12 September 2018

Kleio Akrivou is Associate Professor of Business Ethics and Organisational Behaviour at the University of Reading’s Henley Business School in the United Kingdom. She is also Visiting Scholar at the University of Navarra’s institutes for Business and Humanism and Culture and Society in Spain. She holds a PhD with a cross-disciplinary focus on moral psychology, adult learning and development, and behavioural science from Case Western Reserve University in the United States. Kleio’s current work focuses on non-representational theories of knowledge and how to approach and understand the self and action, with the aim of integrating moral psychology with classical philosophical works on the self, knowing, and life.

In May of this year Kleio published The Inter-Processual Self: Towards a Personalist Virtue Ethics Proposal for Human Agency with Cambridge Scholars, alongside her co-authors José Víctor Orón Semper and Germán Scalzo. The book showcases her current interdisciplinary research, defending a personalist approach to ethics through an analysis of self and action.

Kleio reflects on her experience of working with Cambridge Scholars on the book:


"My co-authors and I worked very harmoniously with CSP in the production of our book. I found that all steps of the work involved (from the final editing of the book to typesetting, cover design, and marketing) to be of high quality in both the process and in terms of the eventual outcome.  I am impressed with the discrete albeit respectful way we have been supported in marketing and communicating the new book to various audiences.  Academics in various disciplines may work for years or even decades to bring a theoretically rigorous and practically relevant new idea or theory to life. The work we do is so dense and intensive that we often lack the experience or a tacit understanding of how to increase our visibility and reach different audiences who may truly benefit by becoming aware of our work. I was impressed by how CSP has been an immensely valuable collaborative partner in this effort of ours, and I am very thankful to all CSP team members for their personal work and the ongoing support they provide to us." 


As part of the Meet our Authors campaign, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on The Inter-Processual Self: Towards a Personalist Virtue Ethics Proposal for Human Agency. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code MOASEP18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 15th October 2018.


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