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210th Birthday of Charles Darwin - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This February, join Cambridge Scholars Publishing as we voyage into the literature on Charles Darwin. Still one of the most original concepts in modern thought, Darwin’s Theory of Evolution has continued to evolve and adapt not only within the field of Life Sciences, but within the Physical, Health and Social Science realms also.

Darwin’s ‘tree of life’ concept applies well to our ethos. As outlined in our Author Promises, a core value of Cambridge Scholars Publishing is diversity, which, like biodiversity, enriches rather than dilutes the tree of knowledge. Naturally, we have selected titles that fit into a broad taxonomy: ranging from nutrition to philosophy.

To celebrate his 210th birthday, we are offering a 50% discount on the below books.

To find out more about each title, click on the image below. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code DARWIN19 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on the 7th March 2019.


This book is about evolution, and what each of us, our self and our consciousness, really are. It highlights how evolution influences the human self and what we think of as our individual personalities, our souls. The theory of evolution, first conceived by Charles Darwin, has been described as the best idea ever conceptualised, and there is quite some truth in this! Still, there is much to discover in relation to evolution, including the scope of this theory for shedding light, often in unexpected ways, on some of the major questions of life. Are humans just another animal species? Are we really more intelligent than our forefathers? What is the connection between Nietzsche, Shakespeare, Hamlet and syphilis? Evolution and I discusses and sheds light on human knowledge and evolution from a range of perspectives including morals and ethics, sex and gender, religion, artificial intelligence, and microorganisms, with often surprising conclusions.

Numerous scholarly articles and books have been written about biologic and social evolution, compassion, life’s meaning, violence and predictions of future outcomes. However, what is not often addressed, but is increasingly desperately needed, is the realization of the evolutionary survival value of caring for others. Evolution of Evolution: The Survival Value of Caring strives to link our humanities and religious philosophies to a scientific understanding of human destiny, and provide a key to meaning in our lives. Though this idea has incubated for over two decades, recent extremism in Charlottesville and global threats of inhumanity and violence make this more timely than ever for all who care about who we are and our children’s future. Furthermore, our capacity for benefit or destruction of Homo sapiens or civilization as we know it sets a ticking timer on the urgency of this realization and focused action; we don’t have ‘forever’ to ‘get it!’

Nature Alive: Essays on the Emergence of and Evolution of Living Agents pays homage to Alfred North Whitehead’s (1861-1947) profound lecture and essay entitled “Nature Alive,” which was one of his most mature expressions of his process-relational metaphysics – a holistic conceptual framework that renders vivid the dynamic character of the natural world and the intrinsic purposiveness, selective agency, and creativity of living organisms. Inspired by, but not beholden to, Whitehead’s process metaphysical “lens,” the contributors to this volume bring a multiplicity of philosophical orientations to the table in challenging the mechanistic and reductionistic neo-Darwinian paradigm that is still dominant today in the life sciences.

Nutrition and Science: A Darwinian Perspective on Nutritional Medicine offers a completely up-to-date summary of nutritional medicine as it applies to frontline medical professionals, medical students and the interested layperson. Newspapers often give contradictory and confusing reports on issues such as alcohol intake, dietary sugars versus fats and the value (or lack thereof) of taking supplements. In addition, many GPs are as confused as their patients on these matters as they get very little education in nutrition either at medical school or afterwards. However, nutritional medicine is not really that confusing. There is some disagreement among experts, but there is a consensus on the most important issues, albeit with slight variations. The book summarises these generally agreed opinions, but explains where there are differences of opinion, detailing the reasons for these.


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