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World Immunization Week 2018 - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month we are pleased to support World Immunization Week, taking place between the 24th and 30th of April. The World Health Organization estimates that immunization currently prevents between 2-3 million deaths per year, but that almost this amount again could be prevented if global vaccination coverage was to improve. World Immunization Week seeks not only to highlight the importance of vaccines and immunization efforts worldwide, but also to celebrate the commitment and efforts of those individuals who devote their lives to stopping preventable diseases.

At Cambridge Scholars Publishing, we are proud to publish texts that contribute to tackling the challenges of vaccination and immunization, as well as texts that unearth the diverse histories and practices of medicine. To mark World Immunization Week, we are therefore offering readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling titles on medicine, medical education, and medical history. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code IMMUNE18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st May 2018.

Picture of A Healthy Life on a Healthy Planet

The majority of people are under the impression that pollution affects mostly the environment. Thus, we are mainly concerned with climate change and the disappearance of wildlife. We are convinced that pollution doesn’t affect us as humans. However, the incidence rate of cancer is higher today than in the 1970s and we are witnessing more and more people with neurological, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and developmental diseases. Why is this so? This book explains how our health is very dependent on the quality of our environment. It explains, demystifies and summarizes in a simple and concise manner how these two sources of pollutants affect our body; which pesticides and sources of energy are the most harmful; the possible alternatives; the habits and misconceptions are preventing us from having a healthy environment; and how each of us can contribute in the improvement of our health and, by the same token, our environment.

Picture of Rejuvenating Medical Education

Returning to Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey for inspiration, this book uses these epics as a medium through which we might think imaginatively about key issues in contemporary medicine and medical education. These issues include doctors as heroes, and the legacy of heroic medicine in an age of clinical teamwork, collaboration and a more feminine medicine. The authors challenge ingrained habits in medical education, such as the way we characteristically “train” medical students to communicate with patients and colleagues; the reduction of compassion to the “skill” of empathy; the rote recital of the medical history as a “song”; and the new vogue for “resilience” as response to increasing levels of stress and burnout in the profession. Drawing on a wealth of experience in the field, the book promotes a new kind of medicine and medical education fit for the 21st century, but envisages these through the ancient lens of Homer’s two epics..

Picture of Systems Thinking in Medicine and New Drug Discovery

This second book in a two-volume set tells how the healthcare community is working with patients and their caregivers to help improve health using P4 medicine, proper nutrition and a healthy lifestyle. The healthcare community is finding ways to predict one’s susceptibility to diseases, so they can be prevented from occurring, when possible. When diseases do emerge, it is developing personalized therapies and ways for patients to participate in their own healthcare. At the same time, systems thinking dispels many misconceptions, such as ‘natural’ foods and ‘superfoods’. However, environmental toxins can counteract our best efforts. Still, systems thinking encourages us to fix the problem and not the blame. This book will appeal to professionals, non-professionals and patients, who can learn how to improve healthcare and prevent diseases, while reversing the effects of global climate change.

Picture of The Medical Pioneers of Nineteenth Century Lancaster

Modern medicine in England as we know it today is chiefly the product of the scientific developments of the nineteenth century. These advances included improved sanitation, the acceptance of the germ theory of disease as a result of the emergence of microbiology, and the advent of painless and routine surgical procedures. How then did medicine evolve in Lancaster during the nineteenth century? The focus here is the history of medicine in Lancaster and a community of practice amongst a few medical professionals who shaped Lancaster’s medical landscape. The reader will be introduced to these remarkable medical men and their names will gradually become familiar. Many of these individuals were second and even third generation surgeons and physicians. Background to these pioneers, as well as their successes and failures, is sketched within the context of Lancaster’s socio-economic environment and growth as an industrial town.


To find out more about World Immunization Week, please click here.

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