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Picture of Translation in the Digital Age

Translation in the Digital Age

Translation 4.0

Editor(s): Carsten Sinner; Christine Paasch-Kaiser; Johannes Härtel

Book Description

Translation, interpreting and translatology face major challenges today, as new technologies provide new ways of investigating our profession, analysing the process of performing these acts of linguistic mediation, or the outcome of our work, and even permit a fresh look at old data. However, aside from a certain improvement in terms of research possibilities, what else does the future hold for translation and interpreting? This volume proposes the label Translation 4.0, suggesting that contemporary translation should actually be understood as programmatic as expressions such as Industry 4.0 and Internet 4.0, which are often used to refer to the increasing application of Internet technology to facilitate communication between humans, machines and products. As the book shows, Translation 4.0 is at least undergoing a process of formation, if it is not already fully developed. The contributions here not only look into developments in translation and interpreting per se, but also explore the consequences of digitalisation for research in this field.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-4470-3
ISBN-10: 1-5275-4470-2
Date of Publication: 01/03/2020
Pages / Size: 257 / A5
Price: £61.99
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Biography

Carsten Sinner is Full Professor of Iberoromance Linguistics and Translation Studies at Leipzig University, Germany. His areas of interest include sociolinguistics, the historiography of linguistics, and translation studies. He has a special interest in perception studies, koineization, and feigned orality.

Christine Paasch-Kaiser is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute of Applied Linguistics and Translatology of Leipzig University, Germany. Her research areas include sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, and translation didactics. She has a special interest in corpus linguistics, syntax, and law and language in the Middle Ages.

Johannes Härtel is an information developer at a German software company and a freelance conference interpreter. During his time as a Research Associate at Leipzig University, Germany, he focused on the impact that technology has on interpretation. His research included areas such as speech translation, distance interpreting, and associated quality assurance issues.