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Frontiers of Knowledge: Literature

On this page you will find details of our Edited Collections in the field of Literature. 

If you are interested in contributing to any of these collections, simply click on the relevant title heading to download a submission form. This page is updated regularly, so if you have a chapter to contribute but cannot see a suitable title, click here to download a general submission form. 


Away from Home: Black British Women's Writing, 1970-1990

Abstract

Away from Home: Black British Women's Writing, 1970-1990 is a collection examining the texts (novels, poetry, short stories, drama) of women writers from the Caribbean and Africa living in the UK between 1970 and 1990. The collection would address the work of writers like Buchi Emecheta, Joan Riley, or Beryl Gilroy--women who settled in England and write specifically about the immigrant experience. The essays will address the black immigrant woman's experience.

About the Editor

Camille S. Alexander completed an MA in Literature from the University of Houston, Clear Lake and a PhD in English at the University of Kent and. Dr. Alexander’s research interests include Caribbean studies and literature; Black British literature; American film; and third-wave feminism. She is currently researching Indian culture in Indo-Trinidadian literature using the novels of Lakshmi Persaud and has recently been published in The Journal of Popular Culture and the edited collection Voodoo, Hoodoo and Conjure in African-American Literature: Critical Essays. Dr. Alexander is an assistant professor of Literature at United Arab Emirates University in Al Ain, UAE.

Keywords

Black British writing; immigrant women; Caribbean female immigrants; African female immigrants


A 21st Century Look at Postcolonial Literature

Abstract

Postcolonial Studies have expanded in time and evolved into a huge field of study that is transdisciplinary and multi-directional. At the current point, critics even discuss whether it is possible to speak of one single "postcolonialism." On the other hand, literature forms the widest playground to reflect the variety of topics and ideas in this field. A 21st Century Look at Postcolonial Literature aims at bringing together a spectrum of studies on postcolonial literature, including examples of novel, poetry, drama, and non-fiction.

About the Editor

Aslı Kutluk is a research assistant at Selçuk University and PhD candidate at Middle East Technical University. She got her BA and MA degrees at Hacettepe University, and she was a visiting researcher at the University of Kent, Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies between 2011-2012. She has specialised in English Literature, and her major research interests include Postcolonial Literature, Travel Writing, and World Drama

Keywords

postcolonial; colonial; resistance; transdisciplinary; transnational; hybridity; subaltern; agency; subjectivity


Ahmed Saadawi: A Casebook

Abstract

This book deals with the works of Iraqi IPAF winner and Man Booker shortlisted novelist Ahmed Saadawi. It deals with his novels and short stories, early poetry, and main artistic aspects of his fiction

About the Editor

Raad Kareem Abd-Aun (b. 1976, PhD in English Literature, University of Baghdad in 2011) is a faculty member at the University of Babylon since 2004. His main research interests are postcolonial literature and literary theory, modern drama, and Iraqi literature. In 2014, he published a volume of poems.

Keywords

Ahmed Saadawi; Iraqi novel; magical realsim; narration; case studies; author interviews


A Tribute to Derek Walcott

Abstract

Coming some three years after the death of Nobel prize-winning poet, playwright, teacher and painter, this book is intended as a Tribute to Derek Walcott (1930-2017). The editors welcome all forms of tribute —critical essays, memoirs, and creative work— addressing any aspect of Derek Walcott’s life and work.

About the Editors

Helen Goethals is professor of Commonwealth Studies at the University of Toulouse. A member of the CAS research centre and an associate member of the Critical Geographies research team, she has written extensively on the relationship between poetry and politics. She edited the Caribbean section of the Special Double issue of Poetry International featuring English language poetry from around the world.

Eric Doumerc is Assistant Professor of Caribbean Studies at the University of Toulouse. His research interests include Caribbean poetry, music, and the Caribbean oral tradition.His recent publications include Celebrate Wha': Ten Black British Poets from the Midlands (Middelesbrough : Smokestack Books, 2011), an anthology which he co-edited with the poet Roy McFarlane and  Dub Poets in Their Own Words (APS Publications, 2017), a collection of interviews with dub poets in England, Jamaica and the USA.

Keywords 

Derek Walcott; Caribbean; Poetry; Drama; Watercolour;  Essay; Memoir; Homage


Abstract

This collection explores the Chinese fictional works produced during the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1912) dynasties. Classical-language and vernacular stories and novels in this period display significant influences, and topics cover history, religions, martial arts, fantasies, human relationships, social criticism, crime and detection, scholars and beauties, etc.

About the Editor

Aiqing Wang is currently employed by Lancaster University. After graduating with a Master of Arts in Linguistics from University College London, she received a PhD in Linguistics from the University of York. Her research areas include Chinese literature, syntax and pragmatics.

Keywords

Chinese literature; Ming-Qing fiction; classical-language novels; vernacular novels; Four Great Classic Novels; Redology


Crisis in Contemporary British Fiction

Abstract

This essay collection seeks to explore how contemporary British authors engage in their fiction with the theme of crisis (as apparent in novels and short stories by Kazuo Ishiguro, Julian Barnes, A S Byatt, Ian McEwan, Graham Swift, Hilary Mantel, Zadie Smith, Colm Toibin, Pat Barker, Martin Amis, etc).

About the Editor

Anastasia Logotheti, PhD, is Professor at Deree College, the American College of Greece. She has published several articles in The Literary Encyclopedia on Kazuo Ishiguro, Graham Swift, and Ian McEwan. Her most recent publications are chapters in the volumes Crossing Borders in Gender and Culture (2018) and Reading Graham Swift (2019).

Keywords

contemporary British fiction; crisis; cultural identity; fragmentation; belonging; social structures


Entanglement and Entropy: The Weave of Claire Messud’s Novels

Abstract

Fiction writer, essayist, and professor Claire Messud explores the embodied contingency of lived experience—in history, politics, philosophy, and culture—through her characters’ interactions and adjustments. From the beginning, in When the World Was Steady (1994), her intricate work follows intimate, cosmopolitan affiliations. Human attachments located precisely in time and space, primarily between women or girls, set in motion unanticipated calamity.

About the Editor

Associate Professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies, University of Guelph, Canada, Sandra Singer’s publications include edited collections Doris Lessing: Interrogating the Times, Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook After Fifty, as well as J. J. Steinfeld: Essays on His Works. Most recently she published the monograph Stock Characters in 9/11 Fiction: Homosociality and Nihilist Performance.

Keywords

Claire Messud; cosmopolitanism; Algeria; gender; novel; American literature


Exploration of the Mythological Elements in Contemporary Narratives

Abstract

Mythology is a set of cultural codes that have played an essential role in the construction of culture, social life, and identity since human history. The transfer of the mythological elements to humanity has been achieved through both the oral and written narratives in literature. Encountering various mythological elements in both classical and contemporary narratives and the repetition of those elements in different forms and periods still remains on the agenda. This book aims to compare the themes of mythological elements used in contemporary narratives with the themes of classical narratives and to investigate the functions of those elements pursuant to semiotics and narratology.

About the Editor

Murat Kalelioğlu is an assistant professor at Mardin Artuklu University in Turkey. His research interests include language and literature, textual analysis and interpretation, semiotics, and semiotic literary criticism. He is the author of the book A literary semiotics approach to the semantic universe of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four (2018) and other many of the academic publications in his study fields.

V. Doğan Günay is a distinguished emeritus professor of Literature, Linguistics, and Semiotics. During his career, he has valuable contributions to the academic environment in both national and international levels by taking part in many academic studies as a researcher, writer, editor, counselor, director, organizer, and member of many scientific organizations. In addition to his academic achievements, he has written more than twenty books including Semiotic Essays (2002), Language and Communication (2013), Introduction to Lexicology (2018), Discourse Analysis (2013), Text Analysis (2018) Introduction to Culturology: Language, Culture and Beyond (2016), A Semiotic Reading: Kuyucaklı Yusuf (2018), as well as writing and publishing many articles with an interdisciplinary perspective involving semiotics, language and linguistics, literary criticism and art.

Keywords

Myth; mythological elements; classical mythology; contemporary mythology; current interpretation of mythology; semiotics; narratology; semiotics of narratives; intertextuality; textual analysis


Fitzgerald-Hemingway-Faulkner: The American Modernist Triad and Postclassical Narratology

Abstract

This book would focus on the new readings of Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner from the angles of post-classical narratology. Except a foreword, this collection has three parts. Each part centers on one writer and consists of three or four chapters.

About the Editor

Xilin Cheng is a retired Professor of English who received his BA at the Sichuan Institute of Foreign Languages (B.A.), an MA from Sichuan University. From 1980 to his retirement in 2013 he held numerous positions as a Lecturer, Associate Professor, and later Professor of English at the same institution. He was a Fullbright Scholar at the University of Chicago from 1988-89, in addition to a post as Senior Visiting Scholar at Harvard University from 1999-2000.

Keywords

Fitzgerald; Hemingway; Faulkner; American Modernist literature; post-classical narratology; new readings


International Perspectives on Australian Fiction

Abstract

This volume will discuss the state of Australian Literary Studies abroad and international perspectives on Australian fiction through new interdisciplinary approaches. Topics will include the globalisation of Australian fiction, the translating and reception of Australian literary texts, the local publishing industries participating in the dissemination Australian literature, inter alia.

About the Editor

Jean-François Vernay is the author of four academic books. The latest are A Brief Take on the Australian Novel (Wakefield Press, 2016), The Seduction of Fiction: A Plea for Putting Emotions Back into Literary Interpretation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) and its sequel: La Séduction de la fiction (Hermann, 2019).

Keywords

Australia; fiction; international perspectives; globalisation; translation; dissemination; transnationalism; publishing; teaching; politics of location


Laughter and Humour in Roman Literature

Abstract

This collective volume aims to improve our understanding of the various ways in which laughter and humour are employed in Roman literary sources and of the purpose that they serve across cultural contexts by examining a wide range of both verse and prose texts from the 2nd c. BC. to the 2nd c. AD.

About the Editor

George C. Paraskeviotis is Adjunct Lecturer at Democritus University of Thrace (Komotini). His main research interests lie in Vergil, Latin pastoral, Augustan poetry and Roman love elegy. He is the author of Vergil’s Eclogues: A study of the Greek and Roman Sources (CSP 2020) and he has published several articles in journals and edited volumes.

Gabriel Evangelou is currently Post-doc Researcher at the University of Cyprus. His research interests lie chiefly in Roman epistolography, Latin epigram, as well as emotion as persuasion in the ancient world. His current research project is a monograph entitled The Art of Reconciliation in the Age of Cicero.

Keywords

Laughter; humour; humour theories; superiority theory; release/relief theory; incongruity theory; emotions; Roman literature


Le Ventre De Solitude

Abstract

The so-said ‘broken and divided Black household’ is already questioned in the United States by many scholars. In the French-speaking
Caribbean – Guadeloupe, Martinique – or even in Paris, in their expatriate community – this reality will be interrogated, desconstructed and analyzed, to give a voice to those fathers whose fatherhood is ransomed.

About the Editor

Sociologist and artivist, Stéphanie Melyon-Reinette is a PhD and independent researcher dedicating herself to investigating Black people and communities’s civilizations, starting with Black Music and Dance, Haitian Diaspora, and since a few years Guadeloupe history and society through her own families’s archiving process and art experimentation and performances.

Keywords

Fatherhood; Family; Postcolonialism; Gender; Guadeloupe; French Caribbean; Masculinity; Decoloniality


Literature and the Philosophical Foundations of Catholic Education

Abstract

This series, Living Life to the Full: Literature and a Catholic Philosophy of Life will investigate how literary texts have reflected in ground-breaking ways, distinctive features of a Catholic philosophy of life. The volumes will demonstrate how literature, by its ability to capture the imagination, is able to evoke facets of human experience related specifically to a Catholic understanding of life.  

About the Editor

Dr. David Torevell worked for 18 years in secondary education, before moving into Higher Education, where he taught and researched Religion, Philosophy and English Literature. He is the author of Losing the Sacred (T&T Clark, 2000) and Liturgy and the Beauty of the Unknown (Ashgate, 2007). He has edited books, published numerous journal articles and was the Series Editor (CSP) for 11 volumes on applied ethics.

Keywords

Literature, Catholic; Philosophy; Imagination; Form; Content; Life; Ground-breaking; Human Experience


Mobilizing Narratives: Narrating (Im)Mobility Injustice

Abstract

Edward Said's summation that "we live in a period of migration, of forced travel and forced residence, that has literally engulfed the globe” (Culture and Resistance, 2003) is an apt description of the riveting and pervasive nature of (im)mobility in contemporary times. Wars, climate change, economic recessions, and social and cultural inequalities all contribute to coerce individuals as well as communities into forced movement or imposed immobility. This collection of articles seeks to investigate the injustices related to free circulation as represented in literary texts.

About the Editor

Hager Ben Driss is Assistant Professor at the University of Tunis. She teaches Anglophone literature and her research addresses gender and postcolonial studies. She is editor of Knowledge: Trans/Formations (Sahar Editions, 2013) and Women, Violence, and Resistance (Arabesque, 2017).

Keywords

Literature; activism; mobility injustice; immigration; refugees; forced im/mobility; ecology; war; revolutions


Myth and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Fiction

Abstract

According to Jack Zipes, “myths and fairy tales seem to know something that we do not know. They also appear to hold our attention, to keep us in their sway, to enchant our lives. We keep returning to them for answers.” (Zipes 1994: 3). In this light, this volume seeks to address the permanence of fairy tale and myth in fiction by focussing on contemporary writers who incorporate them in their work.

About the Editor

Alexandra Cheira is a researcher at ULICES (University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies, Portugal). Her current areas of research include contemporary women’s writing, Women’s Studies, Gender Studies and wonder tales.

Keywords

Contemporary fiction; contemporary writers; fairy tale; myth


New Voices from the Margins: Representations of the Local in the Postmillennial Novel

Abstract

The proposed volume aims at exploring multifaceted representations of local identities in the regional narratives (Irish, Scottish, Welsh and others) that have been thriving on the margins of global literary processes.  As a counterweight to the ‘global novel’, these voices from the margins add tension to the postmillennial interactions between the discourse of globalization and the identity discourse. We welcome papers on literary representations of the emotional and symbolic meanings that people ascribe to the attachment to a local place and of the sense of communal traditions that offer a fixed point in the increasingly globalized world.

About the Editors

Soňa Šnircová is Associate Professor in literary studies in the Department of British and American Studies at the Faculty of Arts at the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik in Košice, Slovakia. She is author of the books Girlhood in British Coming-of-Age Novels: The Bildungsroman Heroine Revisited (2017), Feminist Aspects of Angela Carter’s Grotesque (2012), the textbook Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism: Five Modern Literary Texts in Contexts (2015) and co-editor (with Milena Kostić) of the book Growing up a Woman: The Private/Public Divide in the Narratives of Female Development (2015) and co-editor (with Slávka Tomaščíková) of the book Postmillennial Trends in Anglophone Literatures, Cultures and Media. Her academic interests include theory of the grotesque, British women’s literature, contemporary transformations of the female Bildungsroman, feminism, postfeminism and metamodernism.

Milena Kaličanin is Associate Professor in the English Department in the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Niš, Serbia. She is the author of the books The Faustian Motif in the Tragedies by Christopher Marlowe (2013), Political vs. Personal in Shakespeare’s History Plays (2017), Uncovering Caledonia: An Introduction to Scottish Studies (2018) and English Renaissance Literature Textbook (2020, with Sanja Ignjatović). She is also the co-editor (with Sona Snircova) of the book Growing Up a Woman: The Public/Private Divide in the Narratives of Female Development (2015). Her academic interests include Renaissance English Literature and British (especially Scottish) Studies.

Keywords

postmillennial novel; local; global; margins; identity; discourse; culture; traditions


Re-examining Arthur Conan Doyle

Abstract

This collection reexamines the works and life of Arthur Conan Doyle from multiple disciplinary perspectives. It proposes new ways of studying Conan Doyle, examines overlooked or neglected aspects of his oeuvre, offering fresh perspectives on the multiple genres of his fiction and his relationship to contemporary writers and movements. 

About the Editor

Nils Clausson is Professor Emeritus at the University of Regina, Canada. He has published widely on Victorian and Modern English literature, including articles on Disraeli, Arnold, Dickens, Gaskell, Wilde, Conrad and Lawrence. He is the author of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Art of Fiction: A Revaluation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018).

Keywords

Arthur Conan Doyle; Victorian literature; fin-de-siècle literature; popular fiction; inter-disciplinary approaches; literary criticism; cultural criticism,


Revisiting Jane Austen: A Critical Analysis of Cinematographic Adaptations, Sequels and Rewritings

Abstract

Jane Austen has never lost her appeal, as the proliferation of works related to her novels (or inspired by them) testifies to. This volume seeks to explore recent (2000 onwards) cinematographic adaptations of her works, as well as a series of novels that are inspired by Austen. This group of novels may include rewritings Austen’s work in the 21st century (e.g., the ill-fated The Austen Project), sequels to Austen’s novels (such as Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James) or novels loosely inspired by Austen (Definitely, Maybe in Love).

About the Editor

M. Carmen Gómez Galisteo holds a Ph.D. (sobresaliente cum laude) from the Universidad de Alcalá (Madrid). She is the author of The Wind is Never Gone: Sequels, Parodies and Rewritings of Gone with the Wind (2011), Early Visions and Representations of America (2013) and A Successful Novel Must Be in Want of a Sequel: Second Takes on Classics from The Scarlet Letter to Rebecca (2018) She currently teaches at Universidad Isabel I (Burgos, Spain).

Keywords

Jane Austen; sequels; rewritings; parodies; chick lit; film adaptations


Speaking Picture and Silent Text: Intersections of Word and Image in Victorian Literature

Abstract

The volume would explore how word and image negotiate spaces, presences and absences in and between each other. Topics would include ekphrasis, illustration, artists in literature, writing in art, and related cultural and ideological tropes. It is situated in Humanities, for scholars and students working on Victorian literature and culture.

Editor

Amina Alyal has co-edited collections with Edwin Mellen (Classical and Contemporary Mythic Identities, 2010) and Cambridge Scholars (Victorian Cultures of Liminality, 2018).  Her articles have been published by Routledge, Ashgate, Cambridge Scholars and Edwin Mellen, amongst others, on a range of topics including Early Modern literary theory, and late Victorian Gothic.  

Keywords

ekphrasis; illustration; Victorian; artist; art; painting; visual; interdisciplinary; literature; humanities


Stratified Nature: Women’s Writing and Nature Past, Present, and Future

Abstract

As we continue the study of the Anthropocene and society’s intersections with nature, this collection searches for essays on women’s writing, Anthropocene, and futurism. This anthology’s scope will be broad, with a focus on analysis of women writers, society, and nature in the past, present, and future.

About the Editor

Marie Hendry is Associate Professor of Language and Literature at State College of Florida-Venice, with a PhD in literature from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Current publications include “Motherhood as Ecological Metaphor in Nnedi Okorafor’s Lagoon” and Agency, Loneliness, and the Female Protagonist in the Victorian Novel through Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Keywords

Anthropocene; Gender; literary criticism; eco-criticism; women's writing; futurism


The City as Metaphor in Contemporary Fiction

Abstract

This collection of essays examines how representations of the city in contemporary fiction reflect diverse ideologies of race, class, religion, and gender. Following current studies on the politics of landscape, this book investigates how multiple and even contradictory depictions of cities serve as metaphors for certain cultural and historical complexities.

About the Editor

Ayşe Naz Bulamur is an Associate Professor of English in the Department of Western Languages and Literatures at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. She holds a Ph.D. in Literary Studies from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her research focuses on postcolonial theory, urban theory, feminist criticism, and nineteenth-century and contemporary fiction.

Keywords

City as metaphor; contemporary fiction; politics of landscape; race; class; gender


This collection of essays will draw on the body of work within cognitive criticism and modernist studies. The unique focus will be on the conception of “experientality,” the techniques used by exploratory modernism in evoking real-life experiences. The collection will encourage dialogue with theoretical traditions that interface with the contemporary cognitive turn such as phenomenology, psychoanalysis and classical narratology.

About the Editor

Margrét Gunnarsdóttir Champion is Associate Professor of English Literature, The University of Gothenburg. Her major areas of research interests are British modernism, literary theory and philosophical approaches to literature. She is the author of Dwelling in Language: Character, Psychoanalysis and Literary Consolations (2013) and co-editor of Ethics and Poetics: Ethical Recognitions and Social Reconfigurations in Modern Narratives (2014).

Keywords

modernism; experientality; cognitive narratology; cognitive psychology; phenomenology; embodied minds; emotion; consciousness


The Folktale World and Early Modern Science 

Abstract

This volume should explore the noetic space shared by folk narratives and early modern science. Some creatures, objects and practices, now regarded as fabulous, were once seriously studied by natural philosophers. The connection of folklore and early modern science will bring a fresh perspective on both.

About the Editor

Dr. Svorad Zavarský has been pursuing research in Neo-Latin literature and language since 2002. After working for the Slovak Academy of Sciences for 17 years, he became an independent researcher in 2019. He has previously co-edited the volume Themes of Polemical Theology across Early Modern Literary Genres (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016).

Keywords

early modern, science, folktale, fabulous, Neo-Latin, intellectual history


The Graveyard in Literature: Liminality and Social Critique

Abstract

This volume will focus on literary and other cultural texts that use the graveyard as a liminal space within which received narratives and social values can be challenged, and new and empowering perspectives on the present articulated. They do so primarily by immersing the reader in a liminal space, between life and death, where traditional certainties such as time and space are suspended and new models of human interaction can thus be formulated. Essays in this volume will examine the use of liminality as a vehicle for social critique, paying particular attention to the ways in which liminal spaces facilitate the construction of alternative perspectives.

About the Editor

Dr Aoileann Ní Éigeartaigh is a lecturer in Literature and Cultural Studies at Dundalk Institute of Technology. She has published in the areas of Irish Literature, American Literature and Cultural Studies. In March 2019, she delivered the Annual W.A. Emmerson Lecture on behalf of the Irish Association for American Studies on the subject of “Liminal Spaces and Contested Histories in the Novels of Juan Rulfo and George Saunders”. She is on the review board of The Raymond Carver Review and Messages, Sages and Ages, and will serve as guest editor of a volume of Messages, Sages and Ages on “Intercultural Conversations”, publication pending August 2020.

Keywords

liminality; graveyard; literature; cultural studies; humanities; social values; received narratives; alternative perspectives


The Many Voices of the Los Angeles Novel

Abstract

Los Angeles novels began with Helen Hunt Jackson’s 1888 novel Ramona on persecution of Native Americans. Latino/as, African-Americans, and Asian-Americans have written brilliant Los Angeles novels for decades. Women transformed the Hollywood, detective, and science fiction novels. Gay writers have refashioned detective novels while men’s novels show 20th century class conflicts.

About the Editor

Julia Stein was an oral historian of Los Angeles. She has published five books of poetry, two anthologies of poetry, and co-authored the book Shooting Women:  Behind the Camera, Around the World.  Stein has published journalism for decades and was an English professor at Santa Monica College.

Keywords

innovative; multi-racial; rethinking; re-evaluating; pioneering; opening up; forward-looking; 21st century; re-assesses; reconceive


The Other Dubliners: Literature Against Paralysis in Joyce and his Counterparts

Abstract

Despite his criticism, in Dubliners and elsewhere, Joyce wrote of nothing but his “Dear Dirty Dublin” (Ulysses). UNESCO City of Literature since 2010, Dublin is the birthplace of many literary masters. This collection includes fifteen relational essays on the work of selected Irish writers, juxtaposing local and global themes.

About the Editor

Márcia Lemos is a member of CETAPS-FLUP since 2008 and Visiting Adjunct Professor at ISAG – European Business School. In 2014, she finished her Ph.D. project, a comparative study of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake and Beckett’s Murphy, on a state-funded merit scholarship granted by FCT. She is executive editor of Via Panoramica.

Keywords

Dublin; James Joyce; Dublin-born Irish Writers; Paralysis and Silence; Literary discourses; Identity; Relational forms


Abstract

"The Power of Greenness"  proposes to reexamine the fiction of Poe, Hawthorne, Melville with a view to establishing their contribution to what is called "American environmentalist discourse," the literature that articulates a position on the natural world and man's relation to it. Also, their connections with the early ecological thought will be taken into account.  

About the Editor

Sławomir Studniarz, Associate Professor,  is a Polish scholar, at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, where he gives lectures in American literature and conducts B.A. and M.A. seminars. He has published extensively on Edgar Allan Poe and many other American writers. He has also published several articles on Samuel Beckett.

Keywords

the frontier; the errand into the wilderness; American Transcendentalism; ecology; land ethic; the Gaia Hypothesis; the anthropocentric paradigm; ecocrisis; Anthropocene


The Rise and Rise of Heroic Romance

Abstract

Heroic romance has, from the twelfth century at least, influenced storytelling in many languages, and continues in new forms, frequently encoding cultural and political change. This book explores new perceptions of its range and significance.

About the Editor

After completing his PhD at Southampton University, Lynn Forest-Hill taught medieval and renaissance studies at the same institution until retiring to write. Her publications include work on Tolkien and a limited edition translation of Sir Bevis of Hampton.

Keywords

Change; female subversion; problematic masculinity; translation; cultural geography; fantasy


Tolkien in the 21st Century Reading, Reception, Reinterpretation

Abstract

In our media-saturated 21st century Tolkien's influence in shaping the fantasy genre remians as important as it has always been. New unpublished works and visual products have appeared, films have been released and new visual products are on the making to be presented in 2020. This volume will cover analytical issues concerning such influence from the threefold perspective signified in the title.

About the Editor

Jorge L. Bueno Alonso is senior lecturer at the Department of English, French and German, School of Philology and Translation Studies, University of Vigo (Spain). His main teaching topics are focused on Medieval and Renaissance Literature (OE poetry in translation, Shakespeare on Film) and in Film Studies, escecially the link between litaray and film genres.

Keywords

Tolkien; reception; adaptation; close reaading; reinterpretation; fantasy literature; neomedievalism; translation and the middle ages; Tolkien's legendarium


Toni Morrison: Fiction and Criticism

Abstract

The edition aims to pay tribute to Toni Morrison’s rich literary and scholarly contribution. For her work she won a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize for literature. Morrison wrote novels, short prose, poems and literary criticism. Her fictional work is grounded in African-American history and struggle for freedom. Her scholarly interests include black feminism, postcolonial themes and social issues in general. The volume would invite contributions about various aspects of Morrison’s work.

About the Editor

Aleksandra V. Jovanović’s research interests are mainly in the field of the postmodern literature and literary theory. She teaches English, Irish and Canadian literature at all levels of studies. Her published work includes essays and 3 books about modern British, Irish, Canadian and American literature. As well as English she is fluent in Spanish and Greek.

Keywords

Toni Morrison; fiction; essays; black feminism; unspeakable; African-American; social activism; Nobel Prize; jazz; home/homelesness


Women Writing War: War as Presented by American Women Playwrights

Abstract

The aim of this collection is to analyse plays written by American women that focus on the effects of war on women and on the different roles females can perform during a military conflict, whether as civilians on the so-called home front or as spies, medical personnel, camp followers or soldiers.

About the Editor

Miriam López-Rodríguez is an Associate Professor at the University of Malaga (Spain), where she coordinates the research group on American literature. Among her publications, she has co-edited Staging a Cultural Paradigm (2002), Women’s Contributions to Nineteenth-Century American Drama (2004), Broadway Bravest Woman (2006) and Woman on Trial (2015).

Keywords

American drama; women playwrights; war


Wonder Tales in the Fiction of A. S. Byatt

Abstract

This collected volume will address the relevance of A. S. Byatt’s wonder tales within the wider context of her fiction and invites submissions that specifically explore this relationship. The topics for the proposed chapters include, but are not limited to: gender and genre; female identity; the relationship between narrators and tales; postmodern and/ or feminist undertones vs. traditional modes of wonder tale narrative; frame tale and embedded stories.

About the Editor

Alexandra Cheira is a researcher at ULICES (University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies, Portugal). Her current areas of research include contemporary women’s writing, Women’s Studies, Gender Studies and wonder tales.

Keywords

Contemporary fiction; contemporary writers; fairy tale; myth


World's Travel Literature and Environmental Awareness

Abstract

The book will offer a collection of articles dealing with travel texts from all continents with a focus on their environmental dimension. This will be an ecocritical and ecological approach of travel liteature, suggesting to what extent travel literature might lead to environmental awareness, particularly the relationship between humans and the nonhuman world.

About the Editors

Françoise Besson is Professor emerita of Literatures in English at the University of Toulouse 2 – Jean Jaurès. Her research focuses on the relationship between landscape and writing, ecology and literature in Anglophone literatures, particularly travel literature. She wrote and edited or co-dited several books on those topics. She is the author of collections of poems, tales and short stories. She was the President of the SELVA (Société d'Etudes de la Littérature de Voyage Anglophone) from 2015 to 2019

Keywords 

Environmental awareness; ecocriticismn; ecology; nonhuman world; travel literature; world literature


Writing as Performance: Accounts of Autoethnography

Abstract

The third millennium confronts academics of all disciplines of study with the exigency of publications. Our edited collection finds an outlet for such expressiveness in autoethnography, which helps to emancipate individuals, institutions, addressing their emergent dilemmas as professionals in their fields through scholarly and societies through creating authentic relations between scholars and their writing.

About the Editor

Georgina Oana Gabor is a Lecturer in the department of Philosophy and Communication Studies at West University of Timisoara, Romania. She received a PhD and an MA in Communication Studies from Bowling Green State University, USA. She is the author of six, editor of one, and translator of three books. Through her writing, she explores the heuristic value of qualitative methods in Communication Studies.

Keywords

autoethnography; communication; authenticity; writing as performance


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The Graveyard in Literature: Liminality and Social Critique