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Nelson Mandela Day - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This July, Cambridge Scholars will be proudly celebrating Nelson Mandela International Day on 18th July, the day Mandela was born. The Mandela Day campaign was inaugurated eight years ago in order to create a dynamic legacy of Mandela’s life.

For 67 years, Nelson Mandela devoted his life to the service of humanity — as a human rights lawyer, a prisoner of conscience, an international peacemaker and the first democratically elected president of a free South Africa. On 18th July, the Nelson Mandela Foundation calls on people around the world to devote 67 minutes of their time to helping others, as a way to mark Nelson Mandela International Day.

Nelson Mandela International Day commemorates the lifetime of service Nelson Mandela gave to South Africa and the world. It was launched on his birthday, 18 July, in 2009 via a unanimous decision by the UN General Assembly. Mandela Day calls on us all, every day, to make the world a better place. Each year on 18 July we look back on what has been done, and forward to what will be done.

To mark Mandela Day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our titles related to the study of Nelson Mandela and his legacy. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code MANDELA17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st July 2017.

In spite of the rich repertoire of artistic traditions in Southern Africa, particularly in the areas of drama, theatre and performance, there seems to be a lack of a corresponding robust academic engagement with these subjects. While it can be said that some of the racial groups in the region have received substantial attention in terms of scholarly discussions of their drama and theatre performances, the same cannot be said of the black African racial group. As such, Explorations in Southern African Drama, Theatre and Performance represents a compendium of critical and intellectual discourses on black African drama, theatre and performance in Botswana, Lesotho, South Africa, and Swaziland. The topics covered in the book include, amongst others, ritual practices, interventionist approaches to drama, textual analyses, and the funeral rites (viewed as performance) of the South African liberation icon Nelson Mandela.

Re-engaging the African Diasporas: Pan-Africanism in the Age of Globalization threads together papers that seek to give academic and intellectual impetus to tie the continent’s development to that of the African Diaspora. By harnessing the enormous resources available in our internet age and riding the cresting wave of globalization, the task of re-engagement will be vastly enhanced, and the debates and discussions in this volume will serve to facilitate this re-engagement. A main highlight of the conference was a special tribute to Nelson Mandela to honour his death in December 2013 and celebrate 20 years of South African independence. In these papers, scholars examine Mandela’s role in the transition of South Africa from a racist state to a democratic nation. They critically examine how the ANC’s policies have impacted post-Apartheid South Africa and question what alternatives remain for the future.

What is the greatest, most precious, opportunity that life provides? It is not winning millions in a lottery. Money, fame, intelligence, beauty, a prestigious career, or mere existence will not simply provide us with a good life. We all have the potential to live well, to have a good life, but how can we do so? We can master complex subjects, attain advanced qualifications and demonstrate sound skills; we can become wealthy, and still make a mess of our lives. People can meet the accepted measures of success, yet still not live well. The Opportunity to Live Well: The Wisdom of Nelson Mandela, Gough Whitlam, Pete Seeger and Others demonstrates the challenges and joyous rewards of living well. They inform, and teach us, that we can also live well when we cultivate awareness; altruism; wholeness of body, mind and spirit; resilience and persistence; passion; empathy; a sense of belonging; personal character; self-knowledge; and life-enhancing habits.

History is a powerful tool in the hands of politicians, and can be a destructive weapon since power over the past is the power to decide who is a hero and who is a traitor. However, can history be a proper political weapon during democratisation processes when the past is clearly separated from the present? Are the new order and society founded on the basis of some interpretation of the past, or, rather, are they founded only with reference to the imagined future of the nation? The Politics of Memory in Post-Authoritarian Transitions, Volume One explores such questions through a detailed description of the use of remembrance policies during political transformations. It discusses how interpretations of the past served the accomplishment of transitional objectives in countries as varied as Chile, Estonia, Georgia, Poland, South Africa and Spain. The book is a unique journey through different parts of the world, different cultures and different political systems, investigating how history was remembered and forgotten by certain democratic leaders.


To find out more about Mandela Day, please click here.

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