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Medicine

Cambridge Scholars Publishing’s edited collections and monographs present leading research in medicine across key topics, including the history of medicine, medical ethics, and clinical practice and surgery. Combined, this diverse collection of books will be of interest to healthcare professionals and medical students, as well as researchers in the humanities. 

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Representations of Illness in Literature and Film

This book examines the ways that various syndromes, disorders and diseases appear in modern literature and film. What is especially interesting is that rather than be portrayed as an insurmountable handicap, limitation becomes the hero of the novels and films under discussion.What once would have been rejected as flawed, ill, disea...
£34.99

Simulation-based Medical Training

This volume explores the development process of a Virtual Reality (VR) and web-based medical training system from a user-centred perspective. It highlights the importance of user participation in this context by analysing two case studies concerned with the development of a VR and web-based medical training system for Spinal Anaest...
£34.99

Sociological Perspectives of Health and Illness

Medical sociology has evolved from being considered as an unimportant area of enquiry to being regarded as central to the study of private troubles and public issues. At present, much of what is deemed in sociology as exciting is advancing or contributing to the field of health. It is appropriate, therefore, that an edited text is ...
£44.99

Southern Medicine for Southern People

What is a national medicine? What does it mean for a medicine to be traditional and scientific at the same time? How could a specifically Vietnamese medicine emerge out of the medical practices and treatments that have flourished and waned during key socio-cultural encounters in Vietnam? This book answers these questions by examini...
£44.99

Spas in Britain and in France in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Originating from the age-old belief that water springing from the depths was endowed with healing properties, spas, which first blossomed in the West during the heyday of the Roman Empire, again gained importance and fame in the 18th and 19th centuries, as the increasing medicalisation of thermal water drew crowds to the best-sited...
£14.99

The Anonymous Society

The Anonymous Society is an in-depth anthropological study conducted in Portugal among the 12-Step associations Alcoholics Anonymous, Families Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. Here, the author explores thoroughly issues like therapy, addiction, ritual, religion, identity and anonymity, providing an insightful knowledge of these a...
£34.99

The Clinical Presentation of Parkinson's Disease and the Dyadic Relationship between Patients and Carers

Providing care for someone with a neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson’s disease requires an integrated approach, taking into account the needs of the person with the disorder and family members most closely involved in their care. This is only possible with an understanding of the complex nature of Parkinson’s disease, ex...
£69.99

The Faith Sector and HIV/AIDS in Botswana

This book is a collection of chapters by seasoned scholars of religion covering the role played by various religions at home in Botswana in the struggle against HIV and AIDS. The book is a direct result of field research projects conducted by the authors on the role of religion in a country that once ranked as the worst affected by...
£39.99

The Future of Post-Human Creative Thinking

What exactly makes creative thinking so magical that, somehow, “everyone can be creative” and, by implication, creativity is a good thing to have—to the point that this popular view is fast becoming a fashionable nonsense in this day and age of ours? To put things in a historical perspective—this popular view contrasts sharply with...
£44.99

The Future of Post-Human Language

To what extent is there really a universal structure, whether innate or not, of language for learning? Or conversely, is language learning mainly context-based? And, in the end, does the very nature of language delimit our mental world—such that “the limits of my language mean the limits of my world” or, in a different parlance, co...
£49.99

The Future of Post-Human Law

What makes the rule of law so special that it is to conscientiously punish the “bad” doers and reward the “good” ones—such that, where there is the rule of law, peace and order are to be expected, so that “the rule of law is better than the rule of any individual”?Take the case of international law, as an illustration. While differ...
£49.99

The Future of Post-Human Semantics

Is semantics really so indeterminate that, as W. V. Quine (1960) once argued in Word and Object, in the example about a previously undocumented, primitive tribe, “it is impossible in principle to be absolutely certain of the meaning or reference that a speaker of the primitive tribe’s language attaches to an utterance”? (WK 2011)Th...
£54.99
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