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International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 9th of August, Cambridge Scholars Publishing will be marking this years’ International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. There are more than 370 million indigenous people in the world, and they comprise an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and 5,000 cultures.

Yet the historical pressures of capitalism, colonialism, and globalisation have weighted heavily on the lives and futures of the world’s indigenous communities. These pressures have led to a surge in critical scholarship examining and critiquing the West’s relationship with indigenous peoples, and more recently scholars working from interdisciplinary post-, anti-, and de-colonial perspectives have attempted to highlight the importance of indigenous philosophies, ideas, and worldviews. At Cambridge Scholars, we are proud to contribute to this project not only by publishing the best scholarly work focusing on indigenous peoples and their lives, but by working with indigenous authors to emphasise their voices.

To mark this upcoming day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on four of our most important titles that speak to this theme. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code INDIGENOUS18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st September 2018

Just prior to the federal election of 2007, the Australian government led by John Howard decreed the “Northern Territory National Emergency Response”, commonly known as the Intervention, officially in reaction to an investigation by the Northern Territory government into allegedly rampant sexual abuse and neglect of Indigenous children. Far from improving the living conditions of Indigenous Australians and children, the policies have resulted in disempowerment, widespread despair, criminalisation and higher unemployment. 'And there'll be NO dancing': Perspectives on Policies Impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007 contains fourteen essays by scholars from Australia and Germany examine (historical) contexts and discourses of the Intervention and subsequent policies impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007 from the perspective of diverse academic disciplines. They invite readers to engage in the debate about human rights, about Indigenous self-determination, and about the preservation of Indigenous culture.

As the seat of the origin of social work profession, the global North has dominated the production of social work knowledge while the global South has remained primarily the consumer of knowledge. Community Practices in India: Lessons from the Grassroots is a ground-breaking collaboration by practitioners and academics from India to bring together indigenous knowledge in community organizing from the rich and vast base of experience existing within the country. It also presents an unprecedented example of the contribution made by the College of Social Work, Nirmala Niketan, Mumbai, in addressing societal injustice and leaves the reader with thought-provoking questions around the scope and role of academic institutions towards this end. This volume will engage social work students, practitioners and educators in a critical reflection on the key concepts, processes, strategies and tensions underlying community organizing practices within the Indian context.

At each particular historical moment, the university appears as a heavy and rigid structure resisting changes, whereas, throughout time, it has actually undergone profound transformation. Often such changes have been drastic and almost always provoked by factors external to the university, be they of a religious, political or economic nature. Decolonising the University: The Challenge of Deep Cognitive Justice explores the nature and dynamics of the transformation that the university is undergoing today. It argues that some of the projects of reform currently under way are so radical that the question of the future of the university may well turn into the question of whether the university has a future. A specific feature of this inquiry is the realisation that questioning the future of the university involves questioning its past as well.

In the present era, when all of human civilization is struggling to preserve their individualities as a result of global commercialism and totalitarianism, theatre and drama play a metonymic role in composing and shaping aspects of human existence. However, there is debate as to how much the text and the stage are able to play a significant role towards staging individual voices on the vast global platform. The Indigenous Voice of Poetomachia: The Various Perspectives of Textuality and Performance, explores the different perspectives of textuality and performance. The analytical mode of the plays analysed here reveals different possible directions of dramatic reading. It represents a comprehensive study of drama and theatre, and the contributions will serve as an asset for both undergraduate and graduate students. The indigenous perspectives (both in terms of theatre and drama) provided here push the reader beyond the prevailing clichéd drama and theatre studies.


To find out more about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, please click here.

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