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International Day of Democracy - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Every year, the International Day of Democracy on 15th September provides an annual opportunity to review the state of democracy in the world. 2017 marks the 20th anniversary of the Inter-Parliamentary Union’s Universal Declaration on Democracy, intended to be an international standard to guide governments and citizens, and which will be the subject of a panel discussion at the United Nations’ headquarters in New York.

This year's theme of democracy and conflict prevention focuses on the critical need to strengthen democratic institutions to promote peace and stability. The United Nations state that: “A more integrated approach to foster resilient societies calls for effective and inclusive democratic governance with respect for human rights and the rule of law. Resilient societies are able to mitigate disputes through mediation, dialogue and a reasonable degree of legitimacy of their institutions. Developing effective conflict prevention mechanisms and infrastructures provides a foundation to resolve grievances and sustain peace.”

To mark the International Day of Democracy, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling related titles. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code DEMOCRACY17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd October 2017.

Guardians or Oppressors: Civil-Military Relations and Democratisation in the Mediterranean Region investigates an important phenomenon in the Middle East and the Mediterranean region, namely the role that the military plays in the governments of several states of the region. Can military forces be defined as guardians of a regime in a democratic state? How is it possible to limit the power of armies to solely military prerogatives and competences? How can the intervention of military forces in the political arena in democratising countries be prevented? It is easy to ask these questions, but finding answers is more difficult. Using historical events and theories as examples to follow is an even more complicated task. The contributors to this book develop and analyse the reasons why militaries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean wished to obtain a guardianship role and the methods they used to achieve and maintain it. The book also investigates how these militaries reacted to democratisation in their respective countries, and begins with a conceptual framework followed by examples from Spain, Egypt, Turkey, Lebanon and Iran.

Drawing upon extensive experience of both theoretical and empirical research, according to the Italian school of Political Science, Interests and Stability or Ideologies and Order in Contemporary World Politics provides a holistic assessment of contemporary world politics. It begins by defining concepts such as “world order”, before going on to classify foreign policies into four models of political cultures: namely, the “interests-intensive” conservative; the “ideologies-intensive” liberal, the leftist constructivist, and the leftist Manichean. The volume shows how multipolar and bipolar systems have remained relatively stable, with each main power defending its own interests, yet ultimately not promoting ideas and order. Change periods, however, are instable. Since 2001, Islamic fundamentalism’s threat has prevented both stability and order. Following the Arab Spring, Obama has also abandoned interests-intensive conservative diplomacy, no longer supporting “lesser evils” against “absolute evils”, and waged only “low intensity” wars in Iraq, Syria and Libya.

Leadership and the Problem of Electoral Democracy in Africa: Case Studies and Theoretical Solutions explores the notion that African leaders are fundamentally responsible for electoral malfeasance throughout the continent. The quagmire of fixing elections in order to stay in power ad-infinitum has frequently led – and will continue to lead – to political violence, civil wars, internal displacement of citizens, international refugee crises, and economic malaise with its attendant crisis of underdevelopment. This book provides five case studies selected from Anglophone, Francophone and Lusophone Africa that illustrate some variations and similarities in the dilemma of electoral democracy in this epoch of Africa’s democratic experiment. It suggests, among other factors, Colin Powell’s and Abraham Lincoln’s theoretical templates as pointers for African political chiefs in their struggle for democratic consolidation – a successful move that could advance national legitimacy and political stability critical for impressive development in this millennium.

In the wake of the popular uprisings that have inflamed the region, beginning in Tunisia in December 2010, a drastic reorganisation of their respective state systems is coming into focus in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. Though their paths do not run along parallel lines, they share a common denominator: the determination of their people to become the masters of their destinies, and to do so by grappling with new forms of democracy. Almost five years later, after their rulers became the target of violent mass protests, Tunisia, Egypt and Libya are going through an exceptionally difficult transition, trying to accommodate their nascent constitutional forms to the new forces inspired by the Arab Spring. Responding to changes in the global and regional environment these forces have interacted in complex ways, as evidenced by their impact on the social, cultural, and political life of the states comprised in North African Societies after the Arab Spring: Between Democracy and Islamic Awakening.


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