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Dialogue on Dialect Standardization

Editor(s): Carrie Dyck, Tania Granadillo, Keren Rice, Jorge Emilio Rosés Labrada
Subject: Linguistics

Book Description

This volume provides a space for the development of dialogue between dialectologists, language community activists, and other researchers working on the development of orthographies regarding issues that arise during the creation of writing systems in places where there is dialect variation and an absence of writing systems, or where there is a writing system for a national language but not for the particular related language.

The chapters in this volume address two major themes: first, the imperative for standardization is influenced by many social and political factors, including identity, age, ease of use of the language, and familiarity, as well as the nature of the language itself. The second theme investigated by the authors is the assumption of the value of standardization, which in many cases leads to overt or covert negotiations or conflicts in the process of language planning and orthography development. These themes are addressed through the experiences of the authors of working with languages and dialects in various parts of the world, including Cyprus, Poland, Canada, the Caribbean, and Mexico, among others. The languages examined in this volume include both those for which there have long been writing systems for “standard” dialects (such as Cypriot Greek and Podlachian, which is sometimes said to be a Belarusian-Ukrainian variety) and those for which writing has been only recently introduced (such as Cayuga, Oneida, and Mixean).

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-4438-6661-3
ISBN-10: 1-4438-6661-X
Date of Publication: 01/12/2014
Pages / Size: 203 / A5
Price: £47.99
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Biography

Carrie Dyck is an Associate Professor of Linguistics at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Her research focuses on stabilizing indigenous languages, particularly Cayuga (Iroquoian).

Tania Granadillo is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of Western Ontario. She has worked on endangered languages in Venezuela.

Keren Rice is a Professor in Linguistics at the University of Toronto. She has been involved with orthography standardization, and has taught the subject of developing orthographies

Jorge Emilio Rosés Labrada is a PhD candidate at the University of Western Ontario and the Université Lumière-Lyon 2. His research focuses on the Mako language of Venezuela and the pre-history of the Sáliban family.