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Book of the Month - March 2020

Our Book of the Month for March is The United Nations System: A Synopsis, by one of our most prolific and respected authors, Dr Graeme Baber. The book is Graeme’s 4th publication with Cambridge Scholars Publishing, and serves as an expansion to a chapter of his previous work, Essays on International Law, published by Cambridge Scholars in late 2016.

The book is available to purchase throughout March at a 60% discount, which you can redeem by entering the code ‘BOMMAR60’ at the checkout on our website.

While few would go so far as to call The United Nations a flawless organisation, since its inception at the conclusion of the Second World War it is has nonetheless striven to be a unifying force for good on the world stage.

When most of us think of the UN, our minds are naturally drawn to things such as the upholding of human rights, the de-escalation of tensions, or the provision of humanitarian aid, but just how far does the UN’s remit go? Is there a way to measure the success of its many ventures, and how exactly does an international conglomeration of 193 member states, many of whom are in direct conflict with each other, effectively organise itself? These are just a few of the questions that the book seeks to answer.


Using the UN’s own charter as an analytical framework, Dr Baber provides a condensed history of the UN as an institution, whilst scrutinising the organisational effectiveness of its many and various systems, with a particular focus on its Funds and Programmes, Specialized Agencies, and Regional Commissions. The book lays out, in clear terms, exactly what the global role of the UN is, while simultaneously providing key insights in terms of where and how the organisation can improve.

Concisely written, yet comprehensive in its scope and content, The United Nations System: A Synopsis will be an essential companion to anybody with an interest in the vast complexities of how our world operates on a global scale, from the development of global education and sustainable development, right the way through to peacekeeping, security, and the eradication of poverty.

In writing this book, Dr Baber demonstrates that, while far from perfect, the UN nevertheless remains one of humanity’s most significant achievements in terms of peaceful international co-operation, and should not easily be taken for granted.


Graeme Baber is an independent legal researcher, specialising in financial law and aspects of international law. His previous monographs are The Impact of Legislation and Regulation on the Freedom of Movement of Capital in Estonia, Poland and Latvia (2010); The Free Movement of Capital and Financial Services: An Exposition? (2014); The European Union and the Global Financial Crisis: A View from 2016 (2016); Essays on International Law (2017); International Financial Law: Quo Vadis? (2017); and Preferential Trade Agreements and International Law (2018). He is also an experienced university teacher and has published many papers.

To read an extract of The United Nations System: A Synopsis, or to get your hands on a copy, you can visit its page on our website.

Other works by Graeme Baber published by Cambridge Scholars:

The Impact of Legislation and Regulation on the Freedom of Movement of Capital in Estonia, Poland and Latvia

The Free Movement of Capital and Financial Services: An Exposition?

Essays on International Law


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