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Blog posts tagged with 'recommended read'

Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - April 2018 28 March 2018

This April, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Zeinab Ibrahim has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, and increasingly recognised for its contribution to the field. Zeinab is Teaching Professor of Arabic Studies at Carnegie Mellon University-Qataris and a world-renowned expert on the sociolinguistics of Arabic, especially as it relates to teaching Arabic as a native or foreign language. She has published several books in this field, including Beyond Lexical Variation in Modern Standard Arabic with Cambridge Scholars Publishing in 2009.

We are offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Zeinab’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABAPR18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st May 2018.


Picture of The Influence of Translation on the Arabic Language

Professor Zeinab Ibrahim’s ‘Recommended Read’:

The Influence of Translation on the Arabic Language: English Idioms in Arabic Satellite TV Stations

Author: Mohamed Siddig Abdalla.

This book explores the influence of translation on the Arabic language, with particular emphasis on the translation of English idioms by journalists working at Arabic satellite TV stations, using a mixed-methods approach (quantitative and qualitative).

The Influence of Translation on the Arabic Language raises many vital questions in the fields of English-Arabic translation, machine translation, lexicography and Arabic language academies. The author chose the most viable subjects – journalists – to conduct the study.  It has been mentioned in many other studies that journalists are the ones who translate all new idioms and phrases, thus in some ways they have adopted the role of translators as well.  Up until now, one of the most difficult tasks in the field of machine translation has been translating idioms and phrases. Although it is the role of language academies to carry out these translation tasks, they have not been doing so in the appropriate time frames. The book is a comprehensive study on the issue of translation from English to Arabic, especially idioms, and as such can be considered a pioneering work in this field. The work can be considered a landmark for lexicographers, machine translation, and translators in general. 


For further information on Professor Ibrahim, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - March 2018 28 February 2018

This March, our Editorial Advisory Board member Narcís Bassols has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Narcís is currently a full-time lecturer and researcher in Tourism at the Universidad Externado de Colombia in Bogota, Colombia. He also has practical experience in his field, having worked for several years in the manufacturing industry as an export salesman as well as in the hospitality industry.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Narcís’ pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAR18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd April 2018.


Narcís Bassols’ ‘Recommended Read’:

Privileged Mobilities: Tourism as World Ordering

Editors: Mekonnen Tesfahuney and Katarina Schough.

Privileged Mobilities contributes to a growing school of critical studies of tourism. Mobility is about power and space. In this anthology, a series of questions are raised regarding privileged mobiles – who travels, where and whence, and why – not least from the standpoint of class, gender, ethnicity and citizenship.

This volume is a collective effort by Swedish researchers in the tradition of critical studies in tourism. The authors remind us that tourism can be a source of inequalities, exploitation and continued colonialism. The chapters address topics as varied as tourism in Africa and tourism and gender in order to prove how tourism has pervaded most (if not all) life compartments of today’s individual. Through this mobile individual, domination of the poorer countries has continued in many ways. Firmly grounded in sociological and anthropological traditions, particularly those of tourism, and showing the problems posed by the current understanding of tourism, the book is a clear call to those involved in the industry and the general public to build more equal and socially sustainable tourism.” 


For further information on Narcís, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - February 2018 31 January 2018

This February, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Giovanna Summerfield has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Giovanna, a Professor in Italian and French, currently serves as the Associate Dean for Educational Affairs in the College of Liberal Arts at Auburn University, USA.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Giovanna’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABFEB18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 28th February 2018.


Professor Giovanna Summerfield’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Encounters with the Real in Contemporary Italian Literature and Cinema

Editors: Loredana Di Martino and Pasquale Verdicchio.

This volume explores the Italian contribution to the current global phenomenon of a “return to reality” by examining the country’s rich cultural production in literature and cinema. The resulting interactions will aid the reader in understanding how the critical arts respond to the triumph of hyperrealism in the current era of the virtual spectacle.

The volume ‘Encounters with the Real in Contemporary Italian Literature and Cinema’ is not only an exploration of the contemporary literary and cinematic works contributing to a “return to reality” to raise awareness and have a social impact on readers or viewers, but also an invitation to scan our own minds and souls as artists and art lovers to become changers. In Italian cinema and literature, we have a very rich legacy of changers, artists who did not use the writing or cinematic medium as entertainment but as a social engagement. This volume’s contributors showcase here a series of wonderful current examples, like Prunetti and Valenti, Piccinni and Foschini, Scurati and Siti as well as Saviano and Crialese, Garrone and Sorrentino, Marazzi and Taviani. As we are continuously bombarded by ways of distracting and enjoying ourselves, the theories and works presented here delightfully bring back the crucial mission of impegno (engagement). This is definitely a book and a topic that are paramount in our classrooms, our cultural centers, and our own living rooms.” 


For further information on Professor Summerfield, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - November 2017 31 October 2017

This November, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABNOV17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th November 2017.


Professor David Weir’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Organisational Anatomy: A Manager’s Guide to a Healthy Organisation

Author: Oleg Konovalov.

This book offers a discussion of a new management concept, “Organisational Anatomy”, which views organisational processes and functions from a biological perspective. The Organisational Anatomy approach allows the development of a holistic picture, and will allow businesses to achieve higher performance and recognise problems and difficulties.

Many theories of organisation treat organisations as if they were machines, but Oleg Konovalov treats them as if they were organisms hence his focus on anatomy. Konovalov was an experienced manager in the harsh climate of Russia’s far north before he undertook a doctoral degree at Durham University and became a business consultant as well as a scholar, and he introduces ideas from biology like the ageing process, organisational stiffness, organisational disease and the reproductive capacity of complex organisations into his framework. He is himself alert and alive to the life of organisations and his seasoned experience illuminates his analysis: at one point he comments that “organisations are sensitive to weather”. This insight is typical of the fresh eye with which Konovalov regards the living, breathing organisations in which people also live and work. One of the most interesting chapters is the last, in which Konovalov introduces the concepts of disease, dystrophy and epidemics into his framework. Hopefully these insights will be more fully developed in his next book.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - October 2017 29 September 2017

This October, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters, where he works closely with the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABOCT17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2017.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Meaning in Translation: Illusion of Precision

Editors: Larisa Ilynska and Marina Platonova.

This volume represents a collection of papers on fundamental and applied research on a wide range of linguistic topics, including terminology standardisation and harmonisation, the pragmatic, semantic and grammatical aspects of meaning in translation, and the translation of sacred, legal, poetic, promotional and scientific and technical texts.

Meaning in Translation: Illusion of Precision covers a multitude of topics, which just go to show that translation is both enjoyable and complex. Topics range from the finer points of scientific translation to contracts involving English and Islamic law, and what the translator needs to do about the contrasts between them. There are also some highly specialised papers on topics such as Creole languages in translation which may be intended for the more expert reader, but which will still be accessible to a wider audience.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - September 2017 31 August 2017

This September, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABOCT17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd October 2017.


Professor David Weir’s ‘Recommended Read’:

A Clinical Guide to Organisational Health: Diagnosing and Managing the Condition of an Enterprise

Author: C.M. Dean.

Popular organisational health checks generally focus on a company’s financial status and its ability to compete in the market. This book accepts the similarity between the functioning of living organisms and organisations as proposed by functionalists.

This book could with benefit be read alongside Oleg Konavolov’s Organisational Anatomy which starts from similar conception of the organisation in biological terms. Dean’s book explicitly addresses organisational issues from the standpoint of an informed clinician. The framework incorporates the notions of organisational functions divided into those supporting survival, protection, operations, information, communication and strategy and concluding with advice on achieving and maintaining organisational health and fitness for withstanding competition. It concludes with an Organisational Health checklist that will be valuable for managers and consultants. There is sound and constructive commentary on organisational and individual wellbeing. The boxed case studies and information summaries aid the reader’s journey through this new territory.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - August 2017 31 July 2017

This August, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Jon Nixon has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Jon has authored more than a hundred chapters and peer-reviewed articles over the last thirty years, and is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development at the Education University of Hong Kong.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Jon’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABAUG17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st August 2017.


Professor Jon Nixon’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Learning Across Borders: Perspectives on International and Transnational Higher Education

Editors: Leslie Seawright and Amy Hodges.

This edited collection contributes to a growing body of research in international and transnational education by looking back and looking forward at globalisation’s impact on higher education.

All institutions of higher education are faced with the challenge of thinking through the implication of increasing global interconnectivity. Leslie Seawright and Amy Hodges have provided a much needed resource to help them set about this task. Learning Across Borders brings together scholars from across continents with expertise in a wide range of subject areas and a shared interest in international and transnational higher education. The opening chapters provide some much needed theoretical insights that identify key issues while grounding them in particular curriculum, institutional and regional contexts. The four central chapters of the book focus specifically on pedagogic practice in what Seawright and Hodges term ‘transnational and international spaces’: spaces of transdisciplinary learning in which cultural differences are seen as an invaluable pedagogic resource. In the final chapters the contributors discuss ‘voice’, identity and learning as vital elements within the student experience. Together the chapters add up to a comprehensive and highly informative survey of the field that will be of interest to all those involved in higher education regardless of subject specialism or institutional role.” 


For further information on Professor Nixon, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - July 2017 30 June 2017

This July, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUL17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st July 2017.


Professor David Weir’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Advanced Business Models in International Higher Education

Editors: Jessica Lichy and Chris Birch.

The future of higher education depends on how managers respond to the challenge of rising costs, changing labour markets and new technologies. As the pace of change accelerates, education providers need to redefine their strategy for sustainable success. This volume presents the thinking of leading researchers and academics regarding the new stakeholders in higher education systems.

Universities – and especially Business Schools – are often advised to think more like businesses, to seek unique brand identity and to explore new revenue streams via, for example, increased penetration into international markets. But until this collection there has actually been little serious engagement with the scholarly economic literature of these themes. Universities are aware informally that they need to move beyond simple additionality and mindless reproduction through rolling out offers that have proven their worth in established markets. They need at least to reframe even established successes like MBA programmes into new markets, bounded by unfamiliar cultural expectations. Network-brightness and informal as well as structural availability for forming long-term partnerships are vital for success in the diverse complexity of globalisation. Lichy and Birch’s collection offers insights into these new discourses.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - June 2017 31 May 2017

This June, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim is Professor Emeritus at City University, London, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd July 2017.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Translation Studies beyond the Postcolony

Editors: Kobus Marais and Ilse Feinauer.

This volume explores the role of (postcolonial) translation studies in addressing issues of the postcolony. It investigates the retention of the notion of postcolonial translation studies and whether one could reconsider or adapt the assumptions and methodologies of postcolonial translation studies to a new understanding of the postcolony.

Translation Studies beyond the Postcolony is a thoughtful and thought-provoking collection of papers drawn mainly from across Africa. As the authors point out, over 1300 languages are spoken within the Continent, and they have not perhaps been given the attention they deserve. However, the Southern Hemisphere is well-represented with papers from Brazil and some interesting thoughts on localising a distinguished information source such as Le Monde Diplomatique across nine Latin American states. There are also case studies on de-colonisation, with some quite original choices of country, such as the USA and Ireland. The articles will feed in neatly to the growing debate about the status and position of non-traditional groups and subjects in public life, which may be typified by recent campaigns at Oxford University about Cecil Rhodes, or the predominance of white philosophers in the syllabus at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - May 2017 28 April 2017

This May, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAY17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st May 2017.


Professor David Weir’s  ‘Recommended Read’:

Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) and Poverty Reduction in Africa: Strategic Management Perspective

Authors: Aminu Mamman, Abdul M. Kanu, Ameen Alharbi, Nabil Baydoun.

This volume addresses the vital question of why the millions of dollars of governments’ and international development interventions in the SMEs sector are yet to deliver significant and sustainable employment and poverty reduction in Africa. The book also addresses the questions of how the SMEs sector can help in the eradication of poverty in Africa, and of what policy makers, SMEs operators, would-be entrepreneurs and trainers can do to contribute to poverty reduction through the SMEs sector.

The dedication page is important in contextualising this significant book by establishing the continuing importance of family bonds in the economic cultures of Africa and the theme is reinforced by the emphasis on starting with what is and what needs to be in the needs of African entrepreneurs. So there is an emphasis on cultural issues and the urgent necessity to move beyond what the authors characterise as “spiritual poverty”. The authors understand the linkages between individual ambitions, spirituality and economic frameworks and call for going beyond the technical skills and operational and tactical supports for business development to provide the foundations for revised strategies of development to incorporate the storytelling of entrepreneurial success with the societal aim of reducing poverty. This valuable book is grounded in the empirical social and cultural realities of a rapidly-developing Africa.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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