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Blog posts tagged with 'recommended read'

Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - February 2017 31 January 2017

This February, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABFEB17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 28th February 2017.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Where Theory and Practice Meet: Understanding Translation through Translation

Author: Laurence K. P. Wong

This title is a collection of nineteen papers in translation studies. Unlike many similar books published in recent decades, it focuses on the translation process, on theory formulation with reference to actual translation, on getting to grips with translation problems, and on explaining translation in language which can be understood by the general reader.

This solid volume represents twenty years of thought and hard work on the part of the author. It consists of nineteen papers, dealing to a large extent with Chinese (which presents particular challenges when translating poetry) but which also looks at a plethora of European languages. There is a constant theme running through the papers, that translation is best approached through the study of translation, using such diverse authors as Dante and Shakespeare, and even looking at the martial arts novel and wondering whether this particular world can be fully conveyed in a language other than Chinese. The articles do not require a specific or advanced knowledge of any of the languages used, but they do allow the reader to have a look inside them in order to understand better the question of how they might inter-connect through the vehicle of translation.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - January 2017 23 December 2016

This January, our Editorial Advisory Board member Dr Terri Apter has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Terri is a psychologist and writer, and Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge. Her research focuses on family dynamics - between parents and children at various stages of development, among siblings, and between families connected by marriage.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Terri’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJAN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st January 2017.


Dr Terri Apter’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Need for Sleep: Daybeams - Moondreams - New Schemes

Author: Lisa Pavlik-Malone.

This book explores the influence of fairytale details and imagery on adult cognition. It presents an exploration of possible changes in an individual’s schematic representations that reflect certain artistic re-interpretations of the Sleeping Beauty fairytale, including works of performance art, fiction, and film.

Our need for sleep means that for a third of our lives we have no protection from predators. For this to make sense in evolutionary terms, the benefits must be considerable. In Need for Sleep, Lisa Pavlik-Malone explores the power of both dreams and day-dreaming on our urge to make sense of love, life, death and sexual awakening. In the tradition of Bruno Bettleheim, who drew critical attention to the uses of fairytale on a child's imagination, Lisa Pavlik-Malone challenges common notions of sleep as a passive state, and presents it as a space for transformation and growth. This model is of great interest to psychologists and educators, as well as those of us who continue to value dreams and daydreaming.” 


For further information on Dr Apter, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - June 2016 27 May 2016

This June, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Chrissie Harrington has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. An arts education consultant, Chrissie’s expertise lies in the area of education, the arts and performance, and she has previously been Head of School of Arts and Humanities at University Campus Suffolk.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Chrissie’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUN16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st July 2016.


Professor Chrissie Harrington’s ‘Recommended Read’:

"What is to be Done?": Cultural Leadership and Public Engagement in Art and Design Education

Editors: Steve Swindells and Anna Powell.

Public engagement is high on the policy agendas of university funders, Vice Chancellors, policy makers, and in the wider cultural and public sphere. This book introduces the reader to the different meanings and motivations that underpin this current trend, and will be of interest to postgraduate students and those working in Higher Education and the cultural industries, particularly in the museums and galleries sector.

The contents of this book are accessible and thought provoking, providing a range of discourses between the art and design education, cultural leadership and public engagement, and the broader contexts that define their potential inter-relationship. Texts also reveal that, too often, there is a lack of acceptance and/or awareness of the potential role that art and design education has to play in the development of the cultural agenda. Examples of practices provide an insight into some of the lost opportunities or obstacles that have hindered progress so far. In particular, the dominant evidence-based model that frequently drives practices and opinions, not least within the field of academic research, is highlighted as problematic and potentially obstructive.  The prescribed ‘cultural impact’ measurement tools suggest a lack of regard or understanding of the qualities, characteristics and immeasurable features of art and design education per se in the development of cultural leadership skills and sensibilities, as well as in increased public engagement. Texts probe, argue, reflect and explain “where we are”, and subsequently ask, “what is to be done?” The answer given here lies in the necessity for transparency, dissemination and sharing of research practices – thus articulating a future for the cultural agenda informed by the exciting possibilities offered by art and design education.” 


For further information on Professor Harrington, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - May 2016 29 April 2016

This May, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim Connell is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAY16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st May 2016.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Language across Languages: New Perspectives on Translation

Editors: Emanuele Miola, Paolo Ramat.

The challenging issues that arise for translation studies from socio-cultural changes in Western Europe and all over the world are tackled in this volume according to two intertwined viewpoints: firstly a strictly linguistic perspective, and secondly from the point of view of anthropological linguistics.

Language Across Languages is an eclectic mix of articles arising from a translation conference held in Pavia in 2013, hence the sub-title New Perspectives on Translation. New fields are covered here such as sign language interpreting, dubbing and subtitling, but there is a full range of topics for the fairly specialised reader. Linking the points of cultural contact between Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome and then looking at how the Chinese in recent years have viewed the culture of the West is fascinating, and that leads into the more technical aspects of translating between alien grammars. Different approaches to the technique of translation are also covered, which will be of interest both to those who are new to the business or who have long experience.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - April 2016 30 March 2016

This April, our Editorial Advisory Board member Margaret Exley CBE has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Margaret is well known as an expert on change management and business growth and is frequently retained as an advisor to UK boards and government departments. She is currently chairman of SCT Consultants and Associate Director and founder of Stonecourt.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Margaret’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABAPR16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st May 2016.


Margaret Exley’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Management Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A Global Perspective

Editors: Demetris Vrontis, Georgia Sakka and Monaliz Amirkhanpour.

This book consists of various chapters which focus on the wider contexts of management innovation, entrepreneurship, and human resource management practices. Furthermore, the contributions are authored by scholars from all over the world, allowing the book to adopt a truly global perspective.

This is a fascinating book which works across a huge canvas. The editors have pulled together a very interesting set of research papers on various aspects of innovation and organisation which together add some really interesting perspectives for senior leaders and academics in the field. The book consists of a series of chapters which are very wide ranging, including a chapter for example on how to manage innovation in retailing, others on Sicilian wineries and their websites, one on competitive intelligence and how to organise it, and a paper on marketing universities. What they have in common is that they are evidence based, analytical and seek to go beyond current understanding to add real value to the field. This is a helpful book of readings for anyone interested in innovation and new developments in the organisational aspects, with particularly interesting case studies on the wine industry and retail.” 


For further information on Margaret Exley CBE, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ – March 2016 29 February 2016

This March, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim Connell is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAR16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st March 2016.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Papers in Translation Studies

Editor: Sattar Izwaini.

This book presents cutting-edge research in translation studies, offering stimulating discussions and fresh perspectives on translation theory and practice, and suggests ways of dealing with translation problems.

“Papers in Translation Studies is a good example of the range of titles on offer from Cambridge Scholars Publishing. It is up-to-date in the field, covers a wide range of topics and offers some detailed analysis of key issues but in such a way that they will still be of interest to people interested in translation. There is certainly something there for everyone as it covers topics such as the role of ideology in translation (one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter); in this Shakespeare year there is an analysis of Hamlet in Turkish; translation policies (a key issue in a number of European countries, let alone worldwide) are considered in the light of the experience of Wales; the section on translator training will be of value to lecturers; and the subject of new technologies as applied to translation is a topic of endless variety, though culinary terms in Brazil is probably a first for subject matter!” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - December 2015 30 November 2015

This December, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Bill Speck has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Bill Speck is Emeritus Professor of Modern History at the University of Leeds, and has previously taught at the Universities of Exeter, Newcastle and Hull, as well as in the USA at the College of William and Mary and the Universities of Iowa and Portland State, Oregon.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Bill’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABDEC15 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 4th January 2016.


Professor Bill Speck’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Social Networks in the Long Eighteenth Century: Clubs, Literary Salons, Textual Coteries

Editor: Ileana Baird.

In order to better account for the impressive diversity of positions and relations that characterises the eighteenth-century world, this collection demonstrates the benefits of applying interdisciplinary approaches to sociability, and their role in shedding new light on the way public opinion was formed and ideas disseminated during pre-modern times.

The thirteen essays that appear in this volume bring together a group of scholars from Australia, England, Israel, Italy, and the USA. What they have in common is an interest in collective activities in the long eighteenth century and their susceptibility to analysis by applying to them social networking theories. The collection is divided into four parts: clubs and learned societies; theatrical and epistolary networks; pan-European and transatlantic networks; and textual coteries. The editor, Ileana Baird, provides a helpful overview of the essays in the introduction which pulls them together into a coherent context. Many readers not familiar with the conceptual framework in which the contributions are placed will find it useful to consult it not only before, but also after reading the book.” 


For further information on Professor Speck, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - November 2015 30 October 2015

This November, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Mark Lemon has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Mark is a social scientist and systems specialist, and is currently Professor of Integrated Environmental Systems at the Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development within De Montfort University.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Mark’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABNOV15 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th November 2015.


Professor Mark Lemon’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Identity, Culture and the Politics of Community Development

Editors: Stacey-Ann Wilson.

This book argues that including identity and culture in community development design, and treating identity and culture as an intrinsic asset can be beneficial for all types of community action, from social cohesion to community economic development. It provides a rethinking and reconceptualising of “community” in an international context, and interrogates what community building, community engagement and community development could entail in this context. The chapters explore different conceptual and theoretical frameworks in analysing identity and culture in community development, and provide empirical insights on such efforts around the globe.

This book addresses the continually changing relationship between community development as theory and practice, and, as such, will be of interest to both theoreticians and practitioners. Indeed, it gives the reader the impression that theory and practice are not separate endeavours, but are encapsulated in the reflective practitioner. Through the presentation of diverse and interesting case studies, this text posits the need to actively incorporate identity and culture within the analysis and practice of community development, and, as such ,convincingly critiques homogeneous approaches to planning and development in favour of more nuanced, and flexible, processes. A legitimate component of this critique is that the growing focus on ‘globalisation’ can lead to such homogeneous interpretations. The cases presented here provide varied insights into identity and indigenous communities, activism and community, engagement tools and migration and community integration; they also provide evidence of how movement across space, like contemporary migration, and through time, such as changes in the built environment, community integration, assimilation and separation, are indicative of how local communities emerge and re-structure in response to wider temporal and spatial influences. This dynamic process inevitably means that we need to recognise how communities adapt, retain identities and generate new ones, and this book provides some fascinating case-based insights into how we might understand this.” 


For further information on Professor Lemon, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board's 'Recommended Read' - October 2015 30 September 2015

This October, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Jonathan Winterton has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’, a title noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Jonathan is Professor of Work and Employment and Dean of the Faculty of Business and Humanities at Curtin University Sarawak, Malaysia. He was formerly Professor of Employment at Toulouse Business School, where he served ten years as Director of Research and five years as Director of International Affairs.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Jonathan’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABOCT15 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd November 2015.


Professor Jonathan Winterton’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Work and the Challenges of Belonging: Migrants in Globalizing Economies

Editors: Mojca Pajnik and Floya Anthias.

This book engages with migrant work in globalizing economies, both in the EU and worldwide, to explore the relationships between work and the complexity of migrant belonging in transnational spaces. It is cross-disciplinary and comparative, engaging with theoretical, empirical and policy approaches.

This edited collection approaches migration in the wider context of economic globalization and from a perspective that focuses on the lived experience of migrant workers. The strong representation of transition economies in this collection is particularly welcome. In this analysis, migrants’ mental maps serve to redefine geo-political space around the economies of origin and destination. Such contributions greatly enhance understanding of the complexities of migration around the EU and the former Soviet Union. This collection offers an inspirational, transnational, and multi-disciplinary analysis of some of the complexities of migration in the global era, and in so doing sets new directions for further research. Migration in search of work is already at an unprecedented level and affecting every region of the world, and policy responses are largely inadequate to the task of providing adequate protection. Policy makers in international bodies like the ILO and OECD, supra-national regional bodies like the EU and APEC, as well as representatives of governments, employers and trade unions would do well to read this book to better understand the issues they will need to address.” 


For further information on Professor Winterton, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - September 2015 28 August 2015

This September, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Jon Nixon has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our most noteworthy and best-selling titles in its field. Jon is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and is an Honorary Professor of the University of Sheffield. He currently co-edits the Bloomsbury Perspectives on Leadership in Higher Education series.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Jon’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABSEP15 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th September 2015.


Professor Jon Nixon’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Contemporary Issues in Equity in Education

Editors: Susanne Gannon and Wayne Sawyer.

Contemporary Issues of Equity in Education argues that equity and social justice must be brought back to the centre of discussions about education. It demonstrates collaborative and inclusive approaches for researching schooling in disadvantaged communities, and offers strategies and practices for reimagining schools and universities in ways that enable young people in diverse communities to effectively engage with education.

Contemporary Issues in Equity in Education is an authoritative and wide-ranging collection of research-based papers thatwhile focusing specifically on the Australian contextaddresses issues of general concern and contemporary relevance. All the papers are theoretically grounded, clearly focused and accessible. The contributors include internationally recognised researchers and scholars whose work has been influential in guiding national and international policies relating to education, equality and schooling. It is a book that will be of interest to educational professionals, policy makers working within the field of education, and educational researchers and scholars whose work focuses on equity issues.” 


For further information on Professor Nixon, please click here.


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