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Blog posts tagged with 'recommended read'

Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - July 2017 30 June 2017

This July, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUL17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st July 2017.


Professor David Weir’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Advanced Business Models in International Higher Education

Editors: Jessica Lichy and Chris Birch.

The future of higher education depends on how managers respond to the challenge of rising costs, changing labour markets and new technologies. As the pace of change accelerates, education providers need to redefine their strategy for sustainable success. This volume presents the thinking of leading researchers and academics regarding the new stakeholders in higher education systems.

Universities – and especially Business Schools – are often advised to think more like businesses, to seek unique brand identity and to explore new revenue streams via, for example, increased penetration into international markets. But until this collection there has actually been little serious engagement with the scholarly economic literature of these themes. Universities are aware informally that they need to move beyond simple additionality and mindless reproduction through rolling out offers that have proven their worth in established markets. They need at least to reframe even established successes like MBA programmes into new markets, bounded by unfamiliar cultural expectations. Network-brightness and informal as well as structural availability for forming long-term partnerships are vital for success in the diverse complexity of globalisation. Lichy and Birch’s collection offers insights into these new discourses.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - June 2017 31 May 2017

This June, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim is Professor Emeritus at City University, London, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd July 2017.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Translation Studies beyond the Postcolony

Editors: Kobus Marais and Ilse Feinauer.

This volume explores the role of (postcolonial) translation studies in addressing issues of the postcolony. It investigates the retention of the notion of postcolonial translation studies and whether one could reconsider or adapt the assumptions and methodologies of postcolonial translation studies to a new understanding of the postcolony.

Translation Studies beyond the Postcolony is a thoughtful and thought-provoking collection of papers drawn mainly from across Africa. As the authors point out, over 1300 languages are spoken within the Continent, and they have not perhaps been given the attention they deserve. However, the Southern Hemisphere is well-represented with papers from Brazil and some interesting thoughts on localising a distinguished information source such as Le Monde Diplomatique across nine Latin American states. There are also case studies on de-colonisation, with some quite original choices of country, such as the USA and Ireland. The articles will feed in neatly to the growing debate about the status and position of non-traditional groups and subjects in public life, which may be typified by recent campaigns at Oxford University about Cecil Rhodes, or the predominance of white philosophers in the syllabus at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - May 2017 28 April 2017

This May, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow University in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAY17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st May 2017.


Professor David Weir’s  ‘Recommended Read’:

Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) and Poverty Reduction in Africa: Strategic Management Perspective

Authors: Aminu Mamman, Abdul M. Kanu, Ameen Alharbi, Nabil Baydoun.

This volume addresses the vital question of why the millions of dollars of governments’ and international development interventions in the SMEs sector are yet to deliver significant and sustainable employment and poverty reduction in Africa. The book also addresses the questions of how the SMEs sector can help in the eradication of poverty in Africa, and of what policy makers, SMEs operators, would-be entrepreneurs and trainers can do to contribute to poverty reduction through the SMEs sector.

The dedication page is important in contextualising this significant book by establishing the continuing importance of family bonds in the economic cultures of Africa and the theme is reinforced by the emphasis on starting with what is and what needs to be in the needs of African entrepreneurs. So there is an emphasis on cultural issues and the urgent necessity to move beyond what the authors characterise as “spiritual poverty”. The authors understand the linkages between individual ambitions, spirituality and economic frameworks and call for going beyond the technical skills and operational and tactical supports for business development to provide the foundations for revised strategies of development to incorporate the storytelling of entrepreneurial success with the societal aim of reducing poverty. This valuable book is grounded in the empirical social and cultural realities of a rapidly-developing Africa.” 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - April 2017 31 March 2017

This April, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Jon Nixon has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Jon has authored more than a hundred chapters and peer reviewed articles over the last thirty years, and is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development at the Education University of Hong Kong.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Jon’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABAPR17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th April 2017.


Professor Jon Nixon’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Education in a Society uncertain of its Values: Contributions to Practical Pedagogy

Author: Wolfgang Brezinka.

Uncertainty in value orientations also creates uncertainty in education. Are there ways to escape this dilemma? How can we achieve new clarity on the worldview and moral foundations of education? To what ends should we direct education? With what difficulties should we reckon? What tasks must parents fulfil and which should be assigned to teachers? This book deals with these topics.

We live in a time of immense uncertainty: a time characterised by ‘post-truth’ politics, civil and social unrest, and rabid fanaticism. Wolfgang Brezinka, Emeritus Professor at the University of Konstanz in Germany, has produced a splendid book that prompts us to share the educational and pedagogical implications of these troubled times. It is comprehensive, scholarly, accessible and thought-provoking. It also – notwithstanding its philosophical orientation – focuses on specific instances of educational and pedagogic practice. Readers may find themselves at odds with some elements of Brezinka’s analysis. I for one was unsympathetic towards the Christian orientation of some of the chapters. But the great virtue of this book is that it prompts the reader to take seriously one of the great challenges of our time – namely, how to prepare future generations to live together in a world of difference. This is an important book that will be of interest to all those involved in the education of young people.” 


For further information on Professor Nixon, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - March 2017 28 February 2017

This March, our Editorial Advisory Board chair Professor David Weir has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. David, who is currently Visiting Professor at York St John University, has had an extraordinarily successful academic career which has included leading four university Business Schools and initiating the very first part-time executive MBA in a University business school at Glasgow in the United Kingdom.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on David’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAR17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd April 2017.


Professor David Weir’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Managing Globalization: New Business Models, Strategies and Innovation

Editors: Demestris Vrontis, Stefano Bresciani, Matteo Rossi.

This book presents research and paradigms that transcend classical theory in order to examine how business practice is positively affected by these conditions. Across a multitude of sectors and organisational types, scholars of different business specialisations set the theoretical foundations of contemporary thinking and present their practical implementations.

Arguably ‘globalization’ is a term more often cited or mentioned than it is seriously understood. This collection goes some way towards describing the operational realities of globalization in diverse and complex markets. The book contains evidence-based analyses of the significance of cultural factors and illustrates the tactics used by international organisations to enhance cross-cultural capabilities. Another fascinating chapter applies strategy/structure frameworks to explain performance improvement in the luxury yacht market and concludes with wise advice for both scholars and senior managers. Among several chapters based on Italian experience, one on the innovation capacity of family businesses reflects that “the local network of shared norms and values has become a barrier to local knowledge creation because it constrains interaction rather than leveraging it across geographical boundaries”. This might be an important insight into the possible outcome of Brexit! 


For further information on Professor Weir, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - February 2017 31 January 2017

This February, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABFEB17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 28th February 2017.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Where Theory and Practice Meet: Understanding Translation through Translation

Author: Laurence K. P. Wong

This title is a collection of nineteen papers in translation studies. Unlike many similar books published in recent decades, it focuses on the translation process, on theory formulation with reference to actual translation, on getting to grips with translation problems, and on explaining translation in language which can be understood by the general reader.

This solid volume represents twenty years of thought and hard work on the part of the author. It consists of nineteen papers, dealing to a large extent with Chinese (which presents particular challenges when translating poetry) but which also looks at a plethora of European languages. There is a constant theme running through the papers, that translation is best approached through the study of translation, using such diverse authors as Dante and Shakespeare, and even looking at the martial arts novel and wondering whether this particular world can be fully conveyed in a language other than Chinese. The articles do not require a specific or advanced knowledge of any of the languages used, but they do allow the reader to have a look inside them in order to understand better the question of how they might inter-connect through the vehicle of translation.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - January 2017 23 December 2016

This January, our Editorial Advisory Board member Dr Terri Apter has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Terri is a psychologist and writer, and Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge. Her research focuses on family dynamics - between parents and children at various stages of development, among siblings, and between families connected by marriage.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Terri’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJAN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st January 2017.


Dr Terri Apter’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Need for Sleep: Daybeams - Moondreams - New Schemes

Author: Lisa Pavlik-Malone.

This book explores the influence of fairytale details and imagery on adult cognition. It presents an exploration of possible changes in an individual’s schematic representations that reflect certain artistic re-interpretations of the Sleeping Beauty fairytale, including works of performance art, fiction, and film.

Our need for sleep means that for a third of our lives we have no protection from predators. For this to make sense in evolutionary terms, the benefits must be considerable. In Need for Sleep, Lisa Pavlik-Malone explores the power of both dreams and day-dreaming on our urge to make sense of love, life, death and sexual awakening. In the tradition of Bruno Bettleheim, who drew critical attention to the uses of fairytale on a child's imagination, Lisa Pavlik-Malone challenges common notions of sleep as a passive state, and presents it as a space for transformation and growth. This model is of great interest to psychologists and educators, as well as those of us who continue to value dreams and daydreaming.” 


For further information on Dr Apter, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - June 2016 27 May 2016

This June, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Chrissie Harrington has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. An arts education consultant, Chrissie’s expertise lies in the area of education, the arts and performance, and she has previously been Head of School of Arts and Humanities at University Campus Suffolk.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Chrissie’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUN16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st July 2016.


Professor Chrissie Harrington’s ‘Recommended Read’:

"What is to be Done?": Cultural Leadership and Public Engagement in Art and Design Education

Editors: Steve Swindells and Anna Powell.

Public engagement is high on the policy agendas of university funders, Vice Chancellors, policy makers, and in the wider cultural and public sphere. This book introduces the reader to the different meanings and motivations that underpin this current trend, and will be of interest to postgraduate students and those working in Higher Education and the cultural industries, particularly in the museums and galleries sector.

The contents of this book are accessible and thought provoking, providing a range of discourses between the art and design education, cultural leadership and public engagement, and the broader contexts that define their potential inter-relationship. Texts also reveal that, too often, there is a lack of acceptance and/or awareness of the potential role that art and design education has to play in the development of the cultural agenda. Examples of practices provide an insight into some of the lost opportunities or obstacles that have hindered progress so far. In particular, the dominant evidence-based model that frequently drives practices and opinions, not least within the field of academic research, is highlighted as problematic and potentially obstructive.  The prescribed ‘cultural impact’ measurement tools suggest a lack of regard or understanding of the qualities, characteristics and immeasurable features of art and design education per se in the development of cultural leadership skills and sensibilities, as well as in increased public engagement. Texts probe, argue, reflect and explain “where we are”, and subsequently ask, “what is to be done?” The answer given here lies in the necessity for transparency, dissemination and sharing of research practices – thus articulating a future for the cultural agenda informed by the exciting possibilities offered by art and design education.” 


For further information on Professor Harrington, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - May 2016 29 April 2016

This May, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Tim Connell has chosen his ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Tim Connell is Professor Emeritus at City University, having been head of languages there for nearly twenty years. His particular interest is in the field of professional training for translators and interpreters.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Tim’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABMAY16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st May 2016.


Professor Tim Connell’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Language across Languages: New Perspectives on Translation

Editors: Emanuele Miola, Paolo Ramat.

The challenging issues that arise for translation studies from socio-cultural changes in Western Europe and all over the world are tackled in this volume according to two intertwined viewpoints: firstly a strictly linguistic perspective, and secondly from the point of view of anthropological linguistics.

Language Across Languages is an eclectic mix of articles arising from a translation conference held in Pavia in 2013, hence the sub-title New Perspectives on Translation. New fields are covered here such as sign language interpreting, dubbing and subtitling, but there is a full range of topics for the fairly specialised reader. Linking the points of cultural contact between Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome and then looking at how the Chinese in recent years have viewed the culture of the West is fascinating, and that leads into the more technical aspects of translating between alien grammars. Different approaches to the technique of translation are also covered, which will be of interest both to those who are new to the business or who have long experience.” 


For further information on Professor Connell, please click here.


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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - April 2016 30 March 2016

This April, our Editorial Advisory Board member Margaret Exley CBE has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, noteworthy for the contribution it makes to its field. Margaret is well known as an expert on change management and business growth and is frequently retained as an advisor to UK boards and government departments. She is currently chairman of SCT Consultants and Associate Director and founder of Stonecourt.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Margaret’s pick. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABAPR16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st May 2016.


Margaret Exley’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Management Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A Global Perspective

Editors: Demetris Vrontis, Georgia Sakka and Monaliz Amirkhanpour.

This book consists of various chapters which focus on the wider contexts of management innovation, entrepreneurship, and human resource management practices. Furthermore, the contributions are authored by scholars from all over the world, allowing the book to adopt a truly global perspective.

This is a fascinating book which works across a huge canvas. The editors have pulled together a very interesting set of research papers on various aspects of innovation and organisation which together add some really interesting perspectives for senior leaders and academics in the field. The book consists of a series of chapters which are very wide ranging, including a chapter for example on how to manage innovation in retailing, others on Sicilian wineries and their websites, one on competitive intelligence and how to organise it, and a paper on marketing universities. What they have in common is that they are evidence based, analytical and seek to go beyond current understanding to add real value to the field. This is a helpful book of readings for anyone interested in innovation and new developments in the organisational aspects, with particularly interesting case studies on the wine industry and retail.” 


For further information on Margaret Exley CBE, please click here.


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