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Book of the Month - November 2017 31 October 2017

Our November Book of the Month is Mr Justice McCardie (1869-1933): Rebel, Reformer, and Rogue Judge by Antony Lentin.


According to the Law Journal in 1932, ‘No present-day figure on the Bench is of greater interest than Mr Justice McCardie’. A High Court Judge from 1916 to 1933, no twentieth-century judge was more conspicuous or controversial.

To his critics, he was a ‘rogue judge’ whose headline-hitting pronouncements often angered his fellow judges, called down the ire of the Churches, provoked calls in Parliament for his removal and earned a public rebuke from the Prime Minister.

To his admirers, he was ‘a Crusader on the Bench’, a pioneer who denounced outdated laws, strove to make the law meet the needs of modern society and boldly championed women’s causes, birth control and abortion.

The Law Quarterly Review described him as ‘one of the most interesting men in the history of the English Bench.’


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMNOV17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th November 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“[F]rom the pen of Antony Lentin comes this definitive and scholarly but most entertainingly readable biography of McCardie. There are surprisingly few really good, scholarly, biographies of English judges and this is one of the very best. He makes extensive and fascinating use not merely of the law reports but of a wide range of public and private papers, including McCardie's surviving papers. [T]his is a book to be savoured by anyone with an interest in either the history of the English judiciary or the history of family law in the twentieth century. I cannot recommend it too highly.”

—Sir James Munby, President of the Family Division of the High Court; Family Law Journal


“This is a gem of a book. Under 200 pages in length it is very fully and carefully researched and for the student, however amateur, of the development of English Jurisprudence during an era of massive social change following the close of the Victorian era, a cameo performance of profound insight and quality. For someone who has experienced the unique cloistered and sometimes claustrophobic ambience of the Law courts, Barristers chambers and the Temple it plunges you straight into the early twentieth century world of Bar and Bench with all its professional tittle-tattle and with which we are all still familiar!”

—Sir Paul Coleridge, Chairman of the Marriage Foundation, retired judge of the High Court of England and Wales


“In these post-Brexit vote days when the independence of the judiciary is a hot topic, Antony Lentin’s biography of one of the most controversial judges this country has ever seen is timely. Few have ever publicly expressed themselves with such personal conviction as did Mr Justice McCardie and few have engendered such divided emotions, veering from contempt to something approaching veneration. Lentin leans towards the latter, though like all good lawyers he is scrupulous in recognising the strengths of the other side’s argument and ultimately leaves it to the reader to decide which of the two camps to join.”

—Sally Smith, QC, The Times


“Perhaps the most surprising feature of this lucid and suspenseful biography is that its author – an authority on the lives of eminent British lawyers – comes down heavily in favour of this apparent monster. Yet one comes to the end of this remarkable book with a feeling of gratitude that “Mac” never remotely achieved the kind of power to which he so evidently aspired.”

—W. Sydney Robinson, Wolfson College, Cambridge; Times Literary Supplement


“Lawyers, academics and general readers interested in all things judicial – and their effects on social change – will be especially fascinated. For details read this book, which the author has copiously researched using many original sources.  The result is an absorbing narrative which fills in any number of blanks in the story of Mr Justice McCardie and which therefore makes an important contribution to English legal history.”

—Phillip Taylor, MBE, Barrister-at-Law


“Antony Lentin’s life of Henry Alfred McCardie, published in the centenary year of his appointment to the High Court Bench, offers a fascinating portrait of a judicial figure whose reforming judgments have stood the test of time rather better than some of the public pronouncements that brought him fame and notoriety in his own day.”

—Paul Magrath, Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England & Wales


“This well-researched study of an interesting character (and the not-too-distant legal past) ... offers fascinating insights.”

—David Pickup, The Law Society Gazette


“The eccentric judge – reformer, feminist and gambler – gets a sensitive hearing in Anthony Lentin’s biography.”

—Michael Beloff QC, The Spectator


“This excellent biography by Antony Lentin takes a detached and fascinating look at a very controversial figure. Lentin has combined deep scholarship with vivid imagery, creating a fitting tribute to an extraordinary and populist figure, whose personality and achievements deserve to be remembered. I strongly recommended this striking portrait.”

—Nigel Pascoe QC, Counsel Magazine


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Book of the Month - October 2017 29 September 2017

Our October Book of the Month is The Unity-Based Family: An Empirical Study of Healthy Marriage, Family, and Parenting by H.B. Danesh and Azin Nasseri.


Getting married, forming a family, and parenting are among the most consequential tasks we undertake in our lives. This book is about creating loving and united marriages, nurturing and happy families, and rearing healthy and successful children.

It provides dramatically new concepts and practical strategies on how to achieve these noble objectives in our rapidly changing and challenging world.

Based on current scientific research, original conceptual formulations, and intensive clinical studies, The Unity-Based Family is, at once, groundbreaking, enlightening, helpful, and profound.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMOCT17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“The Unity-Based Family is a must read for anyone who wants to raise intellectually, emotionally, morally, and spiritually healthy children. As a developmental psychologist, I was particularly attracted to, and edified by, the chapters concerning the dynamics of personal development and parenting. I wish I had had the knowledge and wisdom imparted in this book when I started my family forty years ago! Now, I will settle for using it to help my undergraduate students of developmental psychology understand how to create family unity and why that unity is both the foundation of health and the means of healing for families.”

—Rhett Diessner, Professor of Psychology, Lewis-Clark State College


“Once again, in his characteristic style, Dr H. B. Danesh has achieved a lucidity and beauty in his writing that makes difficult concepts not only easy but also a delight to digest. In reading almost every paragraph, one gets a sense of being nourished and challenged at the same time. I found this book to be both an enlightening and aesthetic experience. As a psychologist and educator who has systematically studied the development of life purpose for more than fifteen years, I have found frameworks in this book that I have yet to find articulated in the same way anywhere else.”

—Jenni Menon Mariano, Associate Professor, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee


“The Unity-Based Family is an inspiring book, demonstrating that unity, once translated into action, will meet most of the personal, interpersonal, and collective challenges faced by humanity today. It deals with the concept of unity in the context of the family as the fundamental unit of society, but this book is not only about the family: it is about our life and how to substantially improve its quality.”

—Julio Savi, MD, Author of A Nest on the Highest Branch: Reflections on Human Success, Prosperity and Happiness


“Dr Danesh is a master at breaking down a complex phenomenon into highly understandable elements. In this book, he brings a wonderful clarity to the challenging issues of marriage and family and, in doing so, raises our vision to the beauty and potential of human life.”

—Brian Kirsh, MD, FRCP (C), Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, Toronto


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Book of the Month - September 2017 31 August 2017

Our September Book of the Month is Laughter and War: Humorous-Satirical Magazines in Britain, France, Germany and Russia 1914–1918 by Lesley Milne.

War is no laughing matter. During a war, however, laughter can play a vital role in sustaining morale, both in the armies at the Front and in their homelands. Among wars, the 1914–18 conflict has left a haunting legacy, and remains a central topic in modern European history. This book offers a comparative study of the impact of the war in four countries, and breaks new ground by exploring this through the medium of what their respective populations laughed at. By searching the pages of four humorous-satirical magazines, Punch in the UK, Le Rire (France), Simplicissimus (Germany), and Novy Satirikon (Russia), all of which supported the national war efforts, it examines the ways in which humour made an important contribution to the propaganda war. All four magazines were famous for their cartoons, a selection of which is included, but much of the humour was expressed through the written word, in skits, squibs, comic tales, and light verse. Translated into English, these snapshots of the moment are brought together to chart the responses on both sides of the conflict to issues and unfolding events, identifying the stories that nations liked to tell about themselves and also the ones they liked to be told.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMSEP17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd October 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“[T]his book must be complimented for its vast array of commentary and analysis. Milne has undertaken a massive task in making a comparative analysis of the four nations by focusing on one of each of their important satirical comic journals. A great deal of material and themes are covered, and this perhaps explains the author’s foreword that it was a book ‘a long time in the making’. [...] [T]he achievements of the volume in providing a detailed, interesting and clear comparison of humour across the combatant nations is clear and significant.”

—Pip Gregory, University of Kent; Reviews in History


“The major strength of this work is the variety of sources positioned in transnational comparison. It also includes a number of reproductions of the images used in these wartime publications, including a number of beautiful color plates. As such, it provides a very valuable resource, a kind of compendium of published humor related to the war and its peripheral effects, especially for individuals who do not have command of the requisite languages. [...] The book is a welcome addition to the growing field of cultural studies of the war and is particularly valuable for its transnational approach.”

—Laurie Stoff, Arizona State University; The Russian Review


“There are many small delights in Lesley Milne's book, of fine satirical material to gladden the connoisseur's heart. [...] The verbal snapshots, jokes, sketches, cartoons, caricatures and comic verse from all four nations are undeniably witty, but now feel desperately sad.”

—Kate Macdonald, Visiting Fellow, University of Reading; Times Higher Education


“[This] is in every way an original and fresh contribution to the abundant literature on the First World War.”

—Anthony Cross, Professor Emeritus of Slavonic Studies, University of Cambridge; Journal of European Studies


“This book stands out as a highly original piece of historical research. [...] Anyone embarking on a study of what is still sometimes called the Great War will not want to be without it.”

—Tony Mason, Professor Emeritus, International Centre for Sport History and Culture, De Montfort University, Leicester


“... a splendid book ... wise in its judgements and sparklingly written ... a terrific achievement.”

—Trevor Royle, Military historian


“Lesley Milne’s comprehensive and well-structured compendium of First World War satirical publications is broadly researched and draws on an excellent corpus of primary sources, material from which is used effectively and convincingly throughout. [...] [A] great strength lies precisely in [the author's] teasing out of the key differences in satirical representation, not only across the Allied-Germany divide, but also between attitudes in the Russian, British and French magazines. Overall, given this ‘separative’ discussion, she succeeds in achieving a nuanced and worthwhile analysis.”

—Philippa Read, University of Leeds; The Humorous Times


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Book of the Month - August 2017 31 July 2017

Our August Book of the Month is Art in the Age of Emergence by Michael J. Pearce.

This book delivers sensible emergent aesthetics, explaining the processes that happen in human minds when we share ideas as works of art, skewering the orthodoxies of contemporary art with pragmatic wisdom about why representational art thrives in the new millennium.

Art in the Age of Emergence has captured the imaginations of thinkers and artists alike. This is an indispensable read for those who want to understand representational art in the 21st Century.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on both the hardback and paperback editions of this title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMAUG17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st August 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“[A] hugely enjoyable, intelligent and well-written book. Pearce has that rare ability of writing with both erudition and wit. He uses the science and literature of emergence and complexity to reinvigorate the discussion of what art is, but he manages to take us with him, captivating the reader with his encyclopedic knowledge of art, his poetic reflections on nature and life, and on what it is to be human. Pearce does more than talk about emergence; he gently enchants us with his wisdom and kindness, which ultimately offers something of an emergent experience in itself. This is a text that every artist ought to read.”

—Alan J. Lawson, American Arts Quarterly


“Michael Pearce's book is the first major effort to use emergence as a model for aesthetic theory. Partly a personal meditation, but also an exploration of scientific and philosophical ideas, Art in the Age of Emergence is intended to challenge the current orthodoxies of contemporary aesthetics. […] Art in the Age of Emergence is a dense book that is ultimately quite optimistic, and a genuine conversation-starter.”

—John Seed, Huffington Post


“Michael Pearce is that rare phenomenon – a practicing artist who knows art from the inside and an intellectual versed in what the cognitive sciences teach us about why we make art. This book – part personal meditation, part philosophical exploration, and part scientific survey – is rewarding reading.”

—Stephen R. C. Hicks, Author of Explaining Postmodernism


“The slow but steady return of representational art to the mainstream cannot – and should not – be complete until it is examined, like all worthy artistic phenomena, by learned and incisive commentators who can place it in its proper philosophical contexts. With Art in the Age of Emergence, Michael Pearce has provided just such an analysis, one that is both welcome and accessible to anyone who wants to understand how and why this important development is underway.”

—Peter Trippi, Editor-in-Chief, Fine Art Connoisseur Magazine


“An author’s greatest joy is to see his life’s work brilliantly applied to new fields. The new paradigm of emergent complexity that is revolutionizing the sciences has indeed launched us into a new “age of emergence.” With penetrating insight and provocative examples, Michael Pearce builds a new theory of art upon “emergent experiences” and the artworks that inspire them. This is aesthetics in the grand tradition – after reading it you won’t see mind, matter, or art in the same way again.”

—Philip Clayton, Author of Mind and Emergence: From Quantum to Consciousness


“Michael Pearce’s Art in the Age of Emergence is one of those rare things – a genuinely constructive work. Drawing on resources from philosophy, spirituality and neuroscience, as well as his own engagement with the world of representational art, Pearce both acutely diagnoses the aesthetic bottle-neck of our times and points a way forward to a more aspirational and authentic form of art creation. Though some hackles will be raised by his deft puncturing of postmodern shibboleths, more will cheer. This is a book that is likely to influence and inspire artists for some time to come.”

—Nathan Tierney, PhD, author of Imagination and Ethical Ideals


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Book of the Month - July 2017 30 June 2017

Our July Book of the Month is Restoring the Balance: Using the Qur’an and the Sunnah to Guide a Return to the Prophet’s Islam by John Andrew Morrow.


Restoring the Balance is a penetrating reflection upon the reality of Islam in the modern world. Addressing a myriad of pressing issues that impact Muslims in the East, West, North, and South, it tackles topics that are both difficult and troubling, threading its way through a mine-field of religious, cultural, and ideological issues with courage, balance, caution, and concern.

In a world of extremes, which pits religious fundamentalists against radical reformists, it calls upon Muslims to maintain the middle ground, using the Qur’an and the Sunnah to guide to a return of the Prophet’s Islam.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMJUL17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st July 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“An invaluable and much needed contribution to our national dialogue and our near term future under a Trump administration, "Restoring The Balance" is a critically important and unreservedly recommended addition to community and academic library collections in general, and Islamic Studies supplemental reading lists in particular.”

—Midwest Book Review, 15:12 (December 2016)


“‘Bold’ and ‘courageous.’ Those are the two words that best summarize Restoring the Balance. John Andrew Morrow once again challenges Muslims and non-Muslims to re-think Islam in universalistic terms. He not only tackles bigotry and radicalism head-on, but he also highlights the anti-racist and egalitarian underpinnings of core Islamic teachings. This highly accessible book of short essays will be of interest to academics, intellectuals, students, teachers, and lay-readers; basically, to people of all backgrounds who want to learn more about the real message of Islam. Restoring the Balance has the potential to restore your faith in humanity.”

—Dr Craig Considine, Lecturer of Sociology at Rice University and co-author of Islam and the People of the Book: Critical Studies on the Covenants of the Prophet


“In his latest book, Dr John Andrew Morrow holds a mirror to Muslims to see where they have erred. He touches on many sensitive issues that Muslims would do well to understand and, therefore, rectify. An excitingly informative book that will benefit both the scholar and the lay person.”

—Zafar Bangash, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Islamic Thought; President of the Islamic Society of York Region, Toronto


“Though Muslims invented the university, traditional Islamic scholarship was often informal and personal: You would hear about a teacher of the subject you wanted to learn, travel to meet him or her, and join the ‘classes’ that began after prayer time in the corner of the local mosque. In Restoring the Balance, a leading authority on Islam, Dr John Andrew Morrow, speaks informally, but with great erudition and – most importantly – wisdom. For those of us who can’t go sit in the mosque with him, this book is the next best thing.”

—Dr Kevin Barrett, Editor of 9/11 and American Empire v.2: Christians, Jews and Muslims Speak Out and We Are NOT Charlie Hebdo! Free Thinkers Question the French 9/11; author of Truth Jihad and Questioning the War on Terror


“This is a book of passionate pleas to reason, and it raises ideas that are at once unpopular and urgent.”

—Barbara Castleton, Co-author of Arabic, Islam, and the Allah Lexicon and Global English and Arabic: Issues of Language, Culture and Identity


“Dr Morrow stresses the middle way of Islam as he conveys the hypocrisy of Islamic fundamentalism. Each chapter stands on its own—a must-read for critical thinking.”

—Dr Bridget Blomfield, Author of The Language of Tears: My Journey into the World of Shi‘i Muslim Women


“Inspired, witty and refreshingly honest. As a Muslim convert and a Westerner, I found that Dr Morrow handed a mirror to those very issues which have gnawed at me—this dichotomy in between Islam and some Muslims’ interpretation of Islam. A book of reason and reasoning, Restoring the Balance echoes Dr Morrow’s profound love for Islam, people and knowledge.”

—Catherine Shakdam, Author of Arabia’s Rising: Under The Banner of The First Imam; Director of Programs at the Shafaqna Institute for Middle Eastern Studies


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Book of the Month - June 2017 31 May 2017

Our June Book of the Month is Teaching Classics in English Schools, 1500-1840 by Matthew Adams.

This book provides a concise and engaging history of classical education in English schools, beginning in 1500 and ending with the headmastership of Thomas Arnold of Rugby School. By examining the pedagogical origins of Latin and Greek in the school curriculum, the book provides historical perspective to the modern study of Classics, revealing how and why the school curriculum developed as it did. The book also shows how schools responded and adapted to societal needs, and charts social change through the prism of classical education in English schools over a period of 350 years. Teaching Classics in English Schools, 1500–1840 provides an overview and insight into the world of classical education from the Renaissance to the Victorians without becoming entrenched in the analytical in-depth interpretative questions which can often detract from a book’s readability. It includes previously unpublished material, and a new synthesis and analysis of the teaching of Classics in English schools. This will be the perfect reference book for those who teach classical subjects, in both schools and universities, and also for university students who are studying Classical Reception as part of their taught or research degree.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMJUN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd July 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“Lily’s Grammar, and all that it represents, underlies much of this highly engaging study of Classical education in English schools from ‘the arrival of humanism’ to nearly the end of Thomas Arnold’s transforming headmastership at Rugby School. Adams, equipped with the experience and perceptions of a twenty-first-century teacher of Classics, takes his reader into the classrooms of the three and a half centuries that he covers. By careful analysis of a range of sources ... a strikingly vivid picture is created. [...] This readable volume is a most welcome addition to the growing number of studies of the history of Classical reception.”

—Ceri Davies, Swansea University; The Classical Review, 27.12.2016


“The book is admirably well researched; Adams explores a range of sources such as diaries, letters, school statutes and books published as teaching aids in order to examine what was being taught, how, and why. [...] Altogether, I found this book to be a stimulating and informative read, which allowed me to understand and reflect on the history of both education in general and Classics teaching in particular in this country. I would recommend it to anyone interested in expanding their understanding of the history of teaching.”

—Claire Wood; The Classics Library, 05.04.2016


“[T]his is a fascinating monograph on the history of schools and education, particularly teaching establishments in England between 1500 and 1840, which taught Latin and Greek to boys. The author carefully traces the evolution of teaching philosophies and pedagogical strategies for teaching Classics as a subject. It is interesting to learn how Latin was taught in schools during this period and to witness how Classical Greek became fashionable, unfashionable, and then popular again. Readers will learn about the publishing history of Latin and Greek grammars and textbooks produced by educators for their peers and students. Most importantly, readers will gain a profound understanding of why Latin and Classical Greek are taught as they are today.”

—Dr Miriam Kahn, Kent State University; SHARP News, 18.12.2016


“Beginning as a graduate thesis Adams’ survey investigates the archives of some of the oldest schools in England and gives a vivid picture of the life in schools from the renaissance onwards.  His method is topical within a broad chronological approach, but the writing aims for pace and readability... As some opponents will still use the historical view of Classics as justification for their arguments today, those arguing in favour of Classics need to know where they are coming from. Adams supplies an approachable guide to this world of Classics teaching in one European country in the more recent past.”

—John Bulwer; Euroclassica, 23.06.2016


“This is ... a very detailed book which should certainly be bought by the libraries of all schools which offer classical teaching, and which may, one hopes, find a wider constituency than that.”

—Professor Colin Leach; Classics for All, 30.12.2016


“This book has much to say of great interest about the curriculum and teaching methods, which changed very little in the three hundred years after 1500. [...] [This] book is thought provoking [... and] is highly recommended to anyone interested in the history of our schools and of education in England.”

—Hugh Wright, Former Head of Classics at Cheltenham College; Conference & Common Room, 54:1 (2017)


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Book of the Month - May 2017 28 April 2017

Our May Book of the Month is Kissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean by William Mallinson.


Can Henry Kissinger be described as a serious statesman who altered the course of relations between states? Or was he a shallow impersonator of those whom he admired, and a geopolitical engineer who treated people as collateral fodder, reducing morality to the status of a strategic and tactical tool?

Using the story of Kissinger’s behaviour over Cyprus, backed up by recently revealed government documents, many critical, William Mallinson, former diplomat and leading authority on Cyprus’ history, provides an incisive analysis and evaluation of Kissinger’s approach, revealing a man who appears to have considered political strategy more important than law and ethics.

To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page.


We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMMAY17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st May 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“With a wealth of diplomatic experience and scholarly depth, William Mallinson offers readers a fascinating account of Henry Kissinger’s neglected and typically unscrupulous role in shaping a pro-Turkish geopolitical outcome to the Cyprus conflict that reached crisis levels back in 1974.”

—Richard Falk, Professor Emeritus of International Law, Princeton University


“William Mallinson does a great job by combining a thorough analysis of one of the most influential and controversial figures in international relations during the Cold War era with masterful research of the geopolitical turmoil in the Eastern Mediterranean. Through the lens of battling interests in one of the most politically and historically complicated regions in Europe, and even the world, Dr Mallinson goes deeper than just another sketch on the history of international relations; he digs into behavioural attitudes of grand strategists, making us wonder what are objective truths in global politics, how decisions are made and decision-makers are chosen, and whether any place is left for the conventional understanding of diplomacy.”

—Pavel Kanevskiy, Professor of Political Science; Associate Dean, Faculty of Sociology, Lomonosov Moscow State University


“It will have to be read by all those interested in either Kissinger’s reputation or the details of how the Cyprus crisis of 1974 was resolved.”

—Alan Sked, Emeritus Professor of International History, London School of Economics and Political Science


“William Mallinson has produced an excellently written and documented book that provides us with never-before-published information on the intricacies concerning the Cyprus question, particularly during the period before, during and after the invasion of the island by Turkey in 1974. The role of the UK and of the USA on Cyprus is well defined and the manipulation of historical facts by Henry Kissinger is proven by juxtaposing official documents with Kissinger’s writings and explanations. Mallinson’s book is an important contribution to the history of that period, but is also relevant to understanding today’s decision-making processes in international relations.”

—Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos, Ambassador of Greece ad honorem


“Nothing and nobody can escape Mallinson's courageous and detailed research on the Eastern Mediterranean. He tears away the politically correct agenda surrounding Cyprus and Kissinger. The book is a marvellous indictment of Kissinger's cheerleaders and their humbug on Cyprus. I should tell them: read it, if you dare!”

—Professor Vassilis K. Fouskas, University of East London; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies


“At a time when talks on the Cyprus issue have recommenced, and the Eastern Mediterranean is once again at the epicentre of turmoil, William Mallinson’s “Kissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus” is a stimulating contribution to the discussion on the region. [...] Mallinson ... paints as detailed a picture as possible of the climate, the plots and the machinations before and after the invasions. And one of the book’s main attractions lies in the author’s ability to weave together the politics of the Kissinger era with today’s Cyprus question.”

Charalampos Tsitsopoulos, independentturkey.org, 30.04.2017


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Book of the Month - April 2017 31 March 2017

Our April Book of the Month is The Future of (High) Culture in America, edited by Daniel Asia.

This book brings together the proceedings of the inaugural conference of the University of Arizona Center for American Culture and Ideas (CACI), an institution dedicated to studying and promoting the arts, particularly investigating the relationship between the high arts and culture in America. The conference was titled “The Future of (High) Culture in America,” and was held in March 2014. Presenters and respondents included practicing artists, critics, educators and academics, curators, and art purveyors, all at the top of their game. Papers were presented, followed by comments from a panel of respondents and an audience question and answer period. The conference title can be read as both a statement and a question: Is there high culture in America, and if so, is it in jeopardy? This suggests an opportunity to consider what “culture” or “high culture” means. This book explores a range of subjects, including music, dance, the visual arts (particularly photography), and more general philosophical and psychological matters. As such, it offers a fascinating and provocative kaleidoscope of the position of arts and culture in America.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMAPR17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 30th April 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“A heartfelt review of the American cultural scene by people who have come together to interrogate it. Full of insights and calls for renewal, with an impressive range of reference. Reading this book was a great learning experience, and its findings will surely bring a measure of hope to those who are concerned about the future of high culture in this country.”

—Sir Roger Scruton, Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center


“Daniel Asia and his friends are friends of (high) culture – which can use the friendship, and appreciation, and furtherance. This book is a remembrance of things past and a recommendation for the future.”

—Jay Nordlinger, Senior Editor, National Review


“What is ‘high culture,’ and how is it related to ‘mass culture?’ Is its future uncertain in this information age, and how might life be different given dramatic changes in the arts – whatever their level? The intriguing essays in this book pursue these and other engaging questions, and will interest not only anyone who cares about the arts or crosscurrents in contemporary culture but also people in literature, aesthetics, and social criticism.”

—Robert Audi, John A. O’Brien Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame


“Anyone interested in the fate of our civilization (let alone “high culture”) will want to read this sobering and informative book.”

—Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher, The New Criterion


“This volume is a lively and learned collection of essays by critics at the center of their art forms. They don't waste time lamenting the slow and steady death of high culture in the United States. Instead, they speak of its survival within a democratic culture and among smaller, but fiercely devoted audiences. We hear the best of high culture experience without the grousing over its limited appeal and decay in mainstream media and on college campuses.”

—Mark Bauerlein, Professor of English, Emory University


“An important book for those who care about the state, and fate, of high culture.”

—Bruce Cole, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center


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Book of the Month - March 2017 28 February 2017

Our March Book of the Month is Peter Pan and the Mind of J. M. Barrie: An Exploration of Cognition and Consciousness by Rosalind Ridley.


What is Peter Pan all about? Many of us realise that there is a bit more to the stories than a simple fantasy about flying away to a wonderful place in which to play, and that there is something psychologically rather dark about the events in the stories. But J. M. Barrie’s work has not previously been considered from the perspective of either the science of his time, or the insights of modern cognitive psychology.

This book explores the texts of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (1906) and Peter and Wendy (1911), and argues that Barrie describes the limited mental abilities of infants and animals in order to illuminate the structure of human adult cognition. Barrie’s work contains many insights into what is now referred to as mental representation and theory of mind, areas of cognitive psychology that have been examined scientifically only in the last few decades. Barrie also reflects on the nature of consciousness in a way that parallels modern interests.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMMAR17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd April 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“Neuroscientist Rosalind Ridley, of Newnham College in Cambridge, claims in the just-published Peter Pan and the Mind of JM Barrie that the author’s work identifies key stages of child development. [...] In her book, she shows how the narrative of Peter Pan works on different levels. It is a coming-of-age story, a fantasy for children and adults, and the myth of a golden age, but was also invented by the author “essentially for himself in order to explore and perhaps make some sense of his own emotional difficulties, to investigate the interplay of the world of facts and the world of the imagination and to rediscover the heightened experiences of infancy”.”

—Alison Flood, The Guardian (2nd August 2016)


“In recent years, all the ‘Peter Pan’ texts have been subjected to biographical and psychoanalytical interpretations, but in this book Rosalind Ridley’s original contribution is to analyse the texts to demonstrate Barrie’s knowledge and use of scientific ideas. Barrie was acquainted with men of science and the ideas current at the beginning of the twentieth century. His stories of ‘Peter Pan’ are fictive investigations of the nature of consciousness and of the imagination, sometimes anticipating what scientists have later come to realise. Ridley’s book is a delight to read; the examples she gives are compelling and entirely clear to a reader who has not themselves a scientific background. I recommend it whole-heartedly both to lovers of literature and science.”

—Dr Pam Hirsch, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge


“Until recently, my knowledge of J. M. Barrie was limited to vague memories of seeing the pantomime of Peter Pan as a child. In this wonderful book, Rosalind Ridley reveals how much more there is to Barrie and his creation. Her analysis of the various versions of the story that preceded the play reveals that Barrie was extremely knowledgeable about the scientific developments of his time. Furthermore, many of his ideas can be found in scientific accounts of the brain and the mind that did not appear until several decades later. This accessible book not only provides a fresh insight into the mind of Barrie and a novel introduction to current neuropsychology, but also reminds us of the close ties between creativity in science and in literature.”

—Professor Chris Frith FRS FBA, Institute of Philosophy, University of London


“In Peter Pan and the Mind of J M Barrie: An Exploration of Cognition and Consciousness, neuroscientist Dr Rosalind Ridley unpacks the magic and oddity of the tales that have captivated audiences for generations. In doing so through the lens of her own expertise, she reveals that Barrie had an almost uncanny grasp of human cognitive development four to eight decades before psychologists began to work on similar questions about the way we develop thinking and reasoning skills.”

—University of Cambridge website (3rd August 2016)


“Throughout her sensitive and original readings of these two books, Ridley offers asides that go to the heart of current debates about “the hard problem” of consciousness, Turing’s test for whether a computer has intelligence, and whether some avian behavior demonstrates theory of mind.”

—Dr Terri Apter, Newnham College, Cambridge


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Book of the Month - February 2017 31 January 2017

Our February Book of the Month is Oscar Wilde's Elegant Republic: Transformation, Dislocation and Fantasy in fin-de-siècle Paris by David Charles Rose.


Why was Paris so popular as a place of both innovation and exile in the late nineteenth century? Using French, English and American sources, this first volume of a trilogy provides a possible answer with a detailed exploration of both the city and its communities, who, forming a varied cast of colourful characters from duchesses to telephonists, artists to beggars, and dancers to diplomats, crowd the stage. Through the throng moves Oscar Wilde as the connecting thread: Wilde exploratory, Wilde triumphant, Wilde ruined. This use of Wilde as a central figure provides both a cultural history of Paris and a view of how he assimilated himself there.

By interweaving fictional representations of Paris and Parisians with historical narrative, Paris of the imagination is blended with the topography of the city described by Victor Hugo as ‘this great phantom composed of darkness and light’. This original treatment of the belle époque is couched in language accessible to all who wish to explore Paris on foot or from an armchair.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page. 

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMFEB17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 28th February 2017.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


“This is a book research libraries should keep on the open stacks and readers of ELT may wish to add to their personal reference collections. [...] Rose is led by a desire not only to add detail to the record, but to clean up mistakes in past scholarship. He succeeds in doing this by being careful about chronology and corroboration. [...] Ellmann’s biography of Wilde is a great work of literary scholarship, but its concept of homosexuality is dated and it is wrong or incomplete in many details. Someday it will be superseded by another study of the life. The author of that work will want to have Oscar Wilde’s Elegant Republic close to hand, and will often feel grateful to David Rose.”

—Adrian Frazier; English Language in Transition, 60:2 (2017)


“Oscar Wilde's multiple visits to Paris are well known ... but for many readers, what is less clear is what Paris was all about - reality and cliches or literary fantasies don't always go well together. In Oscar Wilde's Elegant Republic, David Charles Rose looks to remedy this by proposing a socio-cultural cartography drawn from three main areas: transformation, dislocation and fantasy. His stated purpose is to 'influence our understanding of both Wilde’s creativity and his social position' (175), and this book makes it possible to better grasp the many facets of his environment and to better understand the relevance of the famous contrast between the work and the life of a genius.”

—Peter Dunwoodie, Emeritus Professor of French Literature, Goldsmiths, University of London; Rue des Beaux Arts 56 (2016)


“[T]his book stands as a rare and complex gift that Rose has given his readers. It is a sprawling study about a sprawling city at a sprawling time in its existence, yet nonetheless we come from it exhilarated and gratified. [...] Oscar Wilde's Elegant Republic gave me a much clearer sense than I previously had of the creative, emotional and imaginative atmosphere of fin de siècle Paris. It has enhanced my understanding not just of Wilde's writing but of the work of his contemporaries, French, American, and English with far greater effectiveness than any recent criticism I have encountered. Perhaps it is because Rose, unlike so many contemporary literary critics, actually enjoys his topic and writes out of that pleasure.”

—Michael Patrick Gillespie, Florida International University; Irish Literary Supplement, Autumn 2016


“The work examines the relationships and interrelationships which were developed in Paris and Parisian society at this time. It was a large and diverse community, comprised of writers, artists, composers and singers, amongst others, from many different nations. We discover how many non-Parisians came to be residing or sojourning in Paris, what brought them there and their experiences of this great city; oftentimes the narrative is interspersed with a blending of both factual and fictional accounts, which works very well. Through a close reading of Oscar Wilde’s Elegant Republic, we are better able to understand the psyche of Wilde within this cosmospolitan metropolis. [...] Interestingly, it does form the first instalment of a trilogy ... No doubt [the other two volumes] will continue to add to Wilde scholarship in an original, innovative and detailed way, as the first volume has done.”

—Jennifer Martin; Books Ireland (November/December 2016)


“[This] is essentially an encyclopedic survey of Paris in all its facets. Rose, it seems, has digested everything, at least as related to the period. He ranges from the morgue to Montparnasse, caviar to caves, fairies to ferries, cynosure to cyanide. His erudition is vast. [...] It is a book in many ways similar to the city it describes: stitching together threads, wandering off in various directions, floating on the surface, digging for dirt, rambling, reflecting, resting. A labor of love to the city of love.”

—Nikolai Endres, Western Kentucky University; Victorians: Journal of Culture and Literature, 130 (2016)


“In Oscar Wilde’s Elegant Republic, Wilde becomes a prism for reconstructing nineteenth-century Paris as a social and intellectual network – a cosmopolitan and at the same time distinctly French metropolis. In so doing, the book also opens up original perspectives on other bridge figures between British and French cultures, such as John Gray, George Moore, John Singer Sargent and Arthur Symons. Rose makes a compelling case to rethink that often-invoked but rarely properly-explored topic that is Wilde’s involvement with French culture – we just need to remember that even Ellmann, the most authoritative among Wilde’s biographers to date, rattles rather quickly through Wilde’s Parisian associations. It is to be hoped that his book will inspire further research into Wilde’s French connections and, more broadly, into the literary connections between the British and French fin de siècle.”

—Professor Stefano Evangelista, Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford; Editor, The Reception of Oscar Wilde in Europe


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