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Blog posts of '2016' 'June'

Battle of the Somme Centenary - Cambridge Scholars Publishing 30 June 2016

This month, Cambridge Scholars Publishing is proud to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. Numerous events are planned to remember those who gave their lives during the Battle of the Somme (1st July-18th November 1916), one of the most costly battles of the entire war, and 10,000 people are expected to attend the service of remembrance at Thiepval including heads of state and members of royal families.

In 2014, for the First World War centenary, Cambridge Scholars were among the thousands who wrote a letter to an unknown soldier, and this year members of the public have been participating in a project to create the ‘Path of the Remembered’ to commemorate all those who played their part in the Battle of the Somme. For more information, click here.

To mark the Battle of the Somme Centenary, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling titles on World War I. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

In his ground-breaking The Great War and Modern Memory, Paul Fussell claimed that “the dynamics and iconography of the Great War have proved crucial political, rhetorical, and artistic determinants on subsequent life.” Forty years after Fussell’s study, the contributors to this volume reconsider whether the myth generated by World War I is still “part of the fiber of [people’s] lives”. What is the place of the First World War in cultural memory today? How have the literary means for remembering the war changed since the war? Can anything new be learned from the effort to re-imagine the First World War after other bloody conflicts of the 20th century? A variety of answers to these questions are provided in Re-Imagining the First World War: New Perspectives in Anglophone Literature and Culture, which explores the Great War in British, Irish, Canadian, Australian, and (post)colonial contexts. The contributors to this collection write about the war from a literary perspective, reinterpreting poetry, fiction, letters, and essays created during or shortly after the war, exploring contemporary discourses of commemoration, and presenting in-depth studies of complex conceptual issues, such as gender and citizenship.

The First World War: Analysis and Interpretation, Volume 1 is the result of an international conference held at Sapienza University of Rome in June 2014, which brought together scholars from different countries to re-analyse and re-interpret the events of the First World War, one hundred years after a young Bosnian Serb student from the “Mlada Bosna,” Gavrilo Princip, “lit the fuse” and ignited the conflict which was to forever change the world. This book provides new insights into theories of the conflict, and is characterized by internationality, interdisciplinarity and a combination of different research methods. The contributions, based on archival documents from various different countries, international and local historiography, and on the analysis of newspaper articles, postcards, propaganda material, memorials and school books, examine ideological and historiographical debates, the memory of the war and its most important contemporary and popular narratives, and the use of propaganda for the mobilization of public opinion, in addition to military, social, political, economic and psychological aspects of the conflict.

The First World War: Analysis and Interpretation, Volume 2 is the result of an international conference held at Sapienza University of Rome in June 2014, which brought together scholars from different countries to re-analyse and re-interpret the events of the First World War, one hundred years after a young Bosnian Serb student from the “Mlada Bosna,” Gavrilo Princip, “lit the fuse” and ignited the conflict which was to forever change the world. This book provides new insights into theories of the conflict, and is characterized by internationality, interdisciplinarity and a combination of different research methods. The contributions, based on archival documents from various different countries, international and local historiography, and on the analysis of newspaper articles, postcards, propaganda material, memorials and school books, examine the role of intellectuals and artists in the conflict, the issue of minorities and nationalities, the economy, and international relations and politics, in addition to specific case studies such as Russia and the Ottoman Empire, the Caucasus and the Middle East.

The First World War was one of the prime motors of social change in modern British history. Culture and technology at all levels were transformed. The growing impact of the state, the introduction of modern democracy and change in political allegiance affected most aspects of the lives of UK citizens. Whilst most of the current centenary interest focuses on military aspects of the conflict, The Great War: Localities and Regional Identities considers how these fundamental changes varied from locality to locality within Britain’s Home Front. Taken together, did they drastically alter the long-established importance of regional variations within British society in the early twentieth century? Was there a common national response to these unprecedented events, or did strong regional identities cause significant variations? The series of case studies presented in this volume – ranging geographically and by topic – detail how communities coped with the war’s outbreak, its upheavals, its unprecedented mass mobilization on all fronts, and its unforeseen longevity.


To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code SOMME16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2016.


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Book of the Month - July 2016 30 June 2016

Our July Book of the Month is Cultures in Movement, edited by Martine Raibaud, Micéala Symington, Ionut Untea and David Waterman.


The contributors to this volume encourage a re-thinking of the very notion of culture by examining the experiences, situations and the representations of those who chose – or were forced – to change cultures from the nineteenth century to the present day. Beyond a simple study of migration, forced or otherwise, this collective work also re-examines the model of integration. As recent entrants into new social settings may be perceived as affecting the previously-accepted social equilibrium, mechanisms encouraging or inhibiting population flows are sometimes put in place. From this perspective, “integration” may become less a matter of internal choice than an external obligation imposed by the dominant political power, in which case “integration” may only be a euphemism for cultural uniformity. The strategies of cultural survival developed as a reaction to such a rising tide of cultural uniformity can be seen as necessary points of departure for an ever-growing shared multiculturalism.


To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page.

We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this best-selling title. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMJUL16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2016.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving:


A collection of essays, Cultures in Movement addresses important literary and cultural issues, such as memory, hybridization, identity, cultural coherence, globalization. It joins Western (Europe, the US, and Brazil) and Eastern (China, Korea, Japan, India, and Pakistan) references, moving a step beyond widely used notions – traveling cultures, third space, liminality – and suggests that cultural exchanges and migrations are effective displacements of cultures, and not only voyages of cultural fragments or reconstructions of cultural data. The cultural migrations, either of anonymous people or of writers, ultimately commit the individual to an ‘art’ of identity, and require collective and individual strategies which are often to be found in literary works. Cultures in Movement offers remarkable insights into the tension between native cultural heritages and new cultural settings.”

Jean Bessière, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Paris III La Sorbonne Nouvelle


A wide ranging exploration of the impact of migration, diasporic life and postmodern politics on cultural identity, this volume draws broadly on historical and literary analysis and political theory to shed new light on how we negotiate meaning in challenging times. […] Ranging from studies of Nigerian and Tibetan refugees to the struggles of French Protestants in 19th century Quebec, from critical readings of Toni Morrison’s Home to Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, this broad collection of essays interrogates the meaning of identity for those who migrated or those who struggle to find a place in their native land. […] The historical, literary and political analyses in this volume by an impressive, international group of scholars open up a wealth of insight into how both natives and diasporic peoples negotiate their cultural identity.”

Charles R. Strain, DePaul University, Co-editor of Religious and Ethical Perspectives on Global Migration


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Featured Review: In Search of Agamemnon: Early Travellers to Mycenae 30 June 2016

At Cambridge Scholars, we are very proud that many of our authors and their publications are critically acclaimed by eminent scholars in their respective fields. We put our authors at the centre of everything we do, and this month we would like to take this opportunity to highlight a particularly noteworthy review.

This month, we are delighted to showcase Tim Murray’s review of In Search of Agamemnon: Early Travellers to Mycenae, edited by Dudley Moore, Edward Rowlands and Nektarios Karadimas. Tim is Charles La Trobe Professor of Archaeology and Director of the Centre for the Archaeology of the Modern World, based at La Trobe University, Australia.


“I freely admit that I was a bit skeptical about whether yet another book about the history of Mycenae was going to add much more to our stock of knowledge about the place, but I am equally happy to admit that I was wrong. In Search of Agamemnon is at once an introduction to the history of the place as we have come to understand it since ancient times, and a history of the attempts by antiquaries, Grand Tourists, historians and, latterly, archaeologists to get to grips with the Mycenaean world and its legacy. In Search of Agamemnon is an excellent addition to the literature about Mycenae. It is both thoughtful and knowledgeable and thereby enhances our understanding of antiquarianism in the long 19th century.”

–Tim Murray, Bulletin of the History of Archaeology


To find out more about In Search of Agamemnon: Early Travellers to Mycenae, click here. To read Tim’s review in full, click here.

We are always very happy to hear from authors with reviews of their titles and have published an ever-increasing number of reviews on our website. Being well-reviewed is a strong selling point for any book, and at Cambridge Scholars we have a number of ways in which we can help authors and editors to this end.

In the first instance, following publication our dedicated Reviews Editor will contact individuals and publications from our wide-ranging list of contacts. We have up to 20 review copies to send directly to any interested scholars or publications as standard. We appreciate that our authors have specialist knowledge in their subject areas, and we always welcome suggestions of potential reviewers both during and after publication.

For more information on the post-publication process, please visit our dedicated Post-Publication page by clicking here or email marketing@cambridgescholars.com.

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Meet our Authors: Carmen Valero-Garcés – June 2016 14 June 2016

Carmen Valero-Garcés, PhD, is a Professor of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain. She is also the Director of the MA in Intercultural Communication and Public Service Interpreting and Translation program and of the Research Group “FITISPos”, a group dedicated to the study of the quality of communication in multilingual societies. Her current research focuses on the role of interpreters and translators as language mediators across the various settings where they work, and the assessment of their language and interpreting skills.

Her recent publications as author and editor include  Public Service Interpreting and Translation: Training, Testing and Accreditation / Traducción e Interpretación en los Servicios Públicos: Formación, Evaluación y Acreditación (2016); Communicating Across Cultures: A Coursebook on Interpreting and Translating in Public Services and Institutions in Arabic (2014); Communicating in the Healthcare Setting (2013); (Re)visiting Ethics and Ideology in Situations of Conflict (2014); and Crossing Borders in Community Interpreting: Definitions and Dilemmas (2008). She is also the editor of the interdisciplinary double-blind peer review FITISPos-International Journal and the co-editor of the 2014 special issue of PANACE@ dedicated to “Intercultural Communication in the Healthcare Setting.”

Under Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Carmen has authored Health, Communication and Multicultural Communities: Topics on Intercultural Communication for Healthcare Professionals, which has been described as “a precious tool for trainers of future doctors and future healthcare interpreters” by Dr Paola Gentile of the University of Trieste in Babel.


Carmen describes the experience of publishing with Cambridge Scholars:

“Given the high representation of Cambridge Scholars Publishing in certain areas in which I work and that are of interest to me, such as cultural subjects or research concerning communication in multicultural settings, I decided to contact the publishers regarding a book that is apparently geared toward a specific audience—healthcare professionals—and that is as diverse and comprehensive as the communications sector in multilingual and multicultural settings. The publisher’s reply was almost immediate, showing clear interest and proving to be responsive when answering questions regarding the submission of the manuscript. This encouraged me to turn what was merely a proposal into an actual book ready to be published and read in very little time. Once on the market, the book has proven to be of interest to healthcare professionals and Masters students studying Intercultural Communication, Public Service Interpreting and Translation at the University of Alcalá. Overall, the experience has been very positive on both a personal and professional level, and I recommend that any person interested in publishing their manuscript contact Cambridge Scholars either to develop an idea or to send in a text that is nearly finished and ready to be published as a book on the market. In my experience, a response is guaranteed from both the publication and production team, and their quick response rate and capacity for action should also be taken into account.


As part of the Meet our Authors campaign, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on Health, Communication and Multicultural Communities: Topics on Intercultural Communication for Healthcare Professionals. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code MOAJUN16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 15th July 2016.


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Meet our Authors: Sam Wiseman – June 2016 14 June 2016

Sam Wiseman is a Lecturer in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Potsdam, Germany, after he completed his PhD in English Literature at the University of Glasgow in 2013. His first book, The Reimagining of Place in English Modernism, was published by Clemson University Press in 2015, and he has also published articles on Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, John Cowper Powys, Mary Butts, and Colin MacInnes.

Under Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Sam has edited Assembling Identities, a collection of sixteen essays drawn from across the arts, humanities and social sciences, which represents a cross-disciplinary exploration of some of the ways in which identities – whether of individuals, communities, or nations – are constructed, maintained and contested.

Sam describes the experience of publishing with Cambridge Scholars Publishing:

“I worked with Cambridge Scholars Publishing on the essay collection ‘Assembling Identities’, which I edited and introduced. I chose to publish with them partly because I knew other postgraduate students at the University of Glasgow (where I was doing my PhD at the time) had published with them, and had reported a good experience. The publication process was very smooth and straightforward: everyone I corresponded with regarding formatting, design, proofreading and so on was helpful and pleasant, and the whole process was relatively fast. What I particularly appreciated was the creative control I was allowed over the whole process. Cambridge Scholars allowed me to produce exactly the collection I had envisioned, and trusted my editorial decisions. They even allowed me complete freedom over the cover design, which I commissioned a friend who works in graphic design to create. The collection has been an important addition to my CV – I feel it has benefited me to have an edited collection on there at an early stage of my career.”


As part of the Meet our Authors campaign, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on Assembling Identities. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code MOAJUN16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 15th July 2016.


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