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500th Anniversary of the Reformation - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month, Cambridge Scholars is marking the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, a major event in the 16th century that left an indelible mark on not only the landscape in Europe but also further afield. The Reformation is considered to have begun with the publication of Martin Luther’s ‘Ninety-five Theses’ in Wittenberg, Germany, which most believe to have been on 31st October, 1517.

In the words of Tom Rassieur, curator of last year’s exhibition ‘Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation’ at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, USA, “one man, Martin Luther, took a stand that literally shredded the fabric of Europe. It changed theology, it changed politics, it changed society and it changed political boundaries. It gave us a revolution in education, in literacy. There are many, many manifestations of the Reformation.”

To mark this anniversary, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling titles on Christianity since the Reformation.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code REFORMATION17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2017.

A Short History of the Church of England: From the Reformation to the Present Day retraces the history of the Church of England from the Henrician schism (1533–34) to the present day, and focuses on the complex relations between the Church and the State which, in the case of an established Church, are of paramount importance. Theological questions, and in particular the conflicting influences of Catholicism and Protestantism, in its various forms, are also examined. The religious settlement engineered by Elizabeth I and her advisers in the 16th century saved England from the atrocities of religious war. However, the countless theological battles and party feuds which have punctuated the history of the Church suggest that the Elizabethan settlement was not entirely successful. The Church of England today is a “broad Church”, hosting within its fold a wide range of traditions and beliefs. The coexistence between liberals and conservatives and, to a lesser extent, between Anglo-Catholics and Evangelicals, remains uneasy and the unity of the Church is fragile.

The English Reformation was no bolt of lightning out of a clear blue sky. Nor was it an event that was inevitable, smooth, or predictable. Rather, it was a process that had its turbulent beginnings in the late medieval period and extended through until the Restoration. Renovating the Sacred: Faith Communities and the Re-formation of the English Parish Church places the emphasis not just on law makers or the major players, but also, and more importantly, on those individuals and parish communities that lived through the twists and turns of reform. It explores the unpredictable process of the English Reformation through the fabric, rituals and spaces of the parish church in the Diocese of Norwich c. 1450–1662, as recorded, through the churchwardens’ accounts and the material remains of the late medieval and early modern periods. It is through the uses and abuses of the objects, rituals, spaces of the parish church that the English Reformation became a reality in the lives of these faith communities that experienced it.

The Alchemical Virgin Mary in the Religious and Political Context of the Renaissance explores the survival of Roman Catholic doctrine and visual imagery in the alchemical treatises composed by members of the Lutheran and Anglican confessions during the Renaissance and Early Modern periods. It discusses the reasons for such unexpected confessional survivals in a time of extreme Protestant iconoclasm and religious reform. The book presents an analysis of the manner in which Catholic doctrines concerning the Virgin Mary, the Holy Trinity and the Eucharist were an essential factor in the development of alchemical theory and illustration from the medieval period to the seventeenth century. Additional issues explored here include the role played by alchemy in strengthening the leaders of the European defence against the invading Ottoman Turks. Special consideration is given to the role played by the apocalyptic Mary within alchemical texts and pictures as an emblem of the mercurial quintessence.

Themes of Polemical Theology Across Early Modern Literary Genres spans the early modern period and ranges across literary genres, confessional divides and European borders. It brings together scholars to explore the dynamic and profound ways in which polemical theology, its discourses and codes, interacted with non-theological literary genres in this era. Offering depth as well as breadth, the contributions chart a myriad of intersections between Catholic, Orthodox, Lutheran and Reformed polemics and a range of literary types composed in Latin and the vernacular across Europe. Individual essays discuss how genres such as history and poetry often represented a vehicle to promote and validate a particular confessional standpoint. Authors also address the complex relationship between humanism and polemical theology which tends to be radically oversimplified in early modern studies.


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